Climate Change Challenges the Human Imagination

first_imgWe live in strange times. It’s clear that our politicians have been remarkably inept at addressing the climate change crisis. Scientists tell us that we have already injected so much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that, especially in light of the ineptitude of political leadership, it is almost certainly too late for the human race to avoid environmental catastrophe.In short, the chain of events we have set in motion is in all likelihood irreversible.While most of us know these facts, we busy ourselves with other concerns. We have to pick up a dozen eggs on the way home from work. We need to stop at a garage to get the oil changed. We need to reschedule an upcoming dentist appointment.The tension between our everyday concerns and the certainty of climate change — an impending catastrophe that is largely unaddressed — creates a type of insanity. Our insanity is socially acceptable, because we all share it.How do we understand this tension? Scientists have tried to help us achieve understanding by using data and argument, but these scientists have failed — at least if success is measured by counting the number of politicians who display leadership skills, or by a tally of effective actions taken to address the crisis.We are facing an existential challenge: a moral challenge as well as a challenge of the imagination.Perhaps the human soul can only approach an understanding of these issues through art or myth. While art and myth are unlikely to result in reduced carbon emissions, they may help heal our broken souls as we march forward into our uncertain future.Art and myth are the usual ways we explain geologic time. These days, as geologic time becomes suddenly compressed — as glaciers that have endured for millennia melt in a matter… Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberscenter_img Start Free Trial Already a member? Log inlast_img read more

Facebook Earnings Results Show Progress On Mobile

first_imgA Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos See also Facebook earnings summary and earnings slides (pdf). In fact, the now company claims 189 million mobile-only monthly active users, up from just 83 million a year ago and 157 million in the last quarter of 2012The first quarter also saw the debut of the Facebook Home launcher. So far, though, Facebook Home has fewer than a million downloads and only a 2 (out of 5) rating. Sales of the HTC First smartphone, which has Home embedded, have been rumored to be minimal. On the earnings call, Zuckerberg described both Home and the company’s new Graph Search as “long-term investments.” Facebook did not break out mobile usage by geography or platform (e.g. iPhone vs. Android), nor did it  separate user data by age or other demographics. Sanderberg, however, did say that the company’s mobile ad business was doing particularly well in Asia. Do Kids Still Like Facebook?Overall, Facebook brought in $1.46 billion for the quarter, generally in line with Wall Street expectations – and a 38% increase year-over-year. Revenue from advertising hit $1.25 billion, a 43% increase year-over-year. Advertising accounted for 85% of Facebook’s total quarterly revenues, with payments and fees delivering the remainder.Revenue aside, many of the rumors circulating around Facebook concerned worries that the world’s largest social network was beginning to lose members, particularly young users in the U.S. and other developed countries, and that existing users were becoming less engaged. On the conference call, CFO David Ebersman was asked if “kids still like Facebook.” He responded by stating that “Facebook is awesome for everyone, regardless of age. And, yes, kids still like Facebook.” Ebersman also claimed that, “Younger users are more active and engaged than other users… as for competitors, this is not a zero sum game.”While Facebook did not fully address these questions, overall the Facebook user numbers looked relatively healthy:665 million “daily active users” on average for March 2013 – a slight increase over Q4 2012’s 618 million, and a 26% increase year-over-yearMonthly active users were 1.11 billion as of March 31, 2013 – a 23% increase year-over-year and up slightly from 1.056 billion in the fourth quarter of 2012.Instagram had 100 million monthly active users during the quarter brian s hall Related Posts center_img Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Tags:#Facebook#Mark Zuckerberg Mark Zuckerberg likes to say that Facebook is now a “mobile first, mobile best” company – and the company’s earnings report for the quarter ended March 31, 2013 actually backs him up, in both usage rates and revenue:Mobile ad revenue for the quarter ending March 31, 2013 was $375 million, accounted for 30% of the company’s total ad revenues. That is up from 23% in the last quarter of 2012.COO Sheryl Sandberg claimed that Facebook ads helped drive “25 million” app downloads. (Essentially, developers pay to promote their app inside a user’s Newsfeed. Click on the ad and go straight to Google Play or Apple’s App Store.) Zuckerberg added that, “I think it’s clear now that we can create a lot of value for [developers] by providing identity. We’re starting to see real revenue from mobile app installs.” The company said 40% of top-grossing iOS and Android apps were promoted on Facebook.Facebook boasted 751 million mobile “monthly active users” – a 54% increase over the same quarter last year and 71 million more than it registered in the fourth quarter of 2012. Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verificationlast_img read more