FDA approves new cannabis based drug to treat epilepsy

first_img June 28, 2018 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Lauren Phinney, Posted: June 28, 2018 FDA approves new cannabis based drug to treat epilepsycenter_img Updated: 8:56 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The FDA has approved a cannabis based drug to treat epilepsy. Dr. Jerry Shih, Director of Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at UCSD, was in studio to tell KUSI’s Lauren Phinney all about the new drug and an event taking place this weekend designed to raise awareness.LOKK for Epilepsy (dedicated to LOKK Legal) is a San Diego based non-profit organization founded by the family and friends of Koorosh Khashayar and we are dedicated to raising funds and awareness for epilepsy research. Our critical mission is to find a cure for Epilepsy, not just control the seizures, to find a cure for this disorder and to prevail over the challenges that effect so many people each day from experiencing a full life. We will do this through educating and funding research to accelerate treatment.Koorosh Khashayar (owner of LOKK Legal, a San Diego based Law firm) passed away (on September 6, 2015) at the age of 32, from a seizure. He was a pillar of his community and a successful young attorney. Koorosh was an amazing man who worked hard to help the people in his community. He not only donated funds to great causes (Miracle Babies, Susan G. Komen for Breast Cancer, Big Brother/Big Sister of San Diego and many more) , but he also volunteered his free time to feed the homeless at the Urban Angels in San Diego and walked the 60 miles to support the Susan G. Komen foundation’s 3-Day walk for breast cancer awareness numerous times.Koorosh was a man to be admired, who held a high regard for helping others, and he was taken from us too soon. Koorosh was diagnosed with Epilepsy after he had his first seizure when he was only 17 years old. This is when Koorosh and his family began to understand the frustrations of dealing with this disease. The lack of information, funding and research, the lack of actual knowledge about the medication prescribed by doctors, and ongoing testing of multiple medications was alarming. Koorosh was put on different medications and treated by multiple doctors in many cities across California, from Stanford to the University of San Francisco, to San Diego. None of these doctors or medications succeeded in curing his Epilepsy, they only went to attempt to control the seizures. The medications he took (and all epileptic patients take) only reduce the likelihood of a seizure but do not provide a cure. He and his family were very frustrated over the years being told by many doctors that he would be living with this forever, and continue to take various medications, each with their own side effects.Koorosh lived a great life, he did not let this effect how he lived, loved and cared for everyone he encountered. Most of the people that knew him did not know what he was dealing with on a day to day basis. He was very proud and did not want any sympathy, he wanted to be the one who helped others. He was full of life and his family and friends want to ensure the frustration and loss that they have experienced does not affect others. This is why this foundation has been formed, to get the word out, to get the needed funding to finally find a cure for Epilepsy. Browse the Lokk 4 Epilepsy web site to learn more about us and our goals to find a cure for epilepsy. Lauren Phinney last_img read more

President Will Not Shutter Guantánamo Prison Unilaterally Report Says

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The Obama administration is not planning to close the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay through an executive order, making it extremely unlikely President Obama will be able to fulfill his 2008 campaign pledge to shutter the prison before leaving office.White House officials considered the possibility of breaching Congress’ ban on relocating the facility’s remaining prisoners to the United States, but did not find a robust legal avenue to pursue, a source told Reuters.“It was just deemed too difficult to get through all of the hurdles that they would need to get through, and the level of support they were likely to receive on it was thought to be too low to generate such controversy, particularly at a sensitive [time] in an election cycle,” the source said.While the White House has dropped the idea of shuttering the prison unilaterally, Obama could change his mind. Barring executive action, though, the president would need to convince Congress to overturn its ban on closing the prison in order to fulfill his campaign pledge.The White House probably won’t rule out the use of an executive order publicly so as to keep pressure on DOD to approve the release of prisoners who have been accepted by other countries, according to the story. The number of Guantánamo detainees has fallen to 80 now, the lowest since it was opened.Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-Kan.), who represents Fort Leavenworth, one of the sites the Pentagon evaluated as a candidate to house the detainees, applauded the report.“Finally, President Obama has abandoned the notion of using an executive order to close the Guantanamo Bay detention center — this type of order would have been illegal and unconstitutional,” Jenkins said in a written statement. “Both the American people and Congress have repeatedly and consistently stated that the detention center should be kept open and must be kept open to protect America’s national security.”last_img read more