Redpath calls up Gloucester’s young guns

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “They’ll be disappointed about last week because, if they lose, they rarely lose by that amount. They’ll be pretty fired up at the weekend.”“We’ve highlighted that they don’t lose very often at home and we know that we’re in for a very tough game and it could well be close. We’re going away from home to a top two club and we’ve got to front up.”“The performance will be key. As we’ve said in the past, if the performance is there then the result will take care of itself.”Gloucester Rugby:Olly Morgan; Jonny May, Tim Molenaar, Eliota Fuimaono-Sapolu, Tom Voyce; Nicky Robinson, Jordi Pasqualin; Nick Wood, Olivier Azam, Paul Doran-Jones; Will James, Jim Hamilton; Peter Buxton, Akapusi Qera, Luke Narraway (capt)Replacements: TAGS: GloucesterNorthampton Saints Injuries and international call ups mean that Gloucester Rugby Head Coach Bryan Redpath has called up a couple of his young guns for Saturday’s Aviva Premiership Rugby fixture at Northampton Saints.Redpath has tried, by and large, to keep faith with the side that defeated London Irish at Kingsholm last Friday.However, the resumption of the RBS Six Nations sees the Lawsons, Rory and Scott, named in the Scotland squad and Mike Tindall, of course, is away captaining England.In addition, Dave Lewis and Charlie Sharples both picked up knocks in the victory over the Exiles and are ruled out.As a result, Jonny May (above) and Jordi Pasqualin are named on the right wing and at scrum half respectively and England U20 scrum half Dan Robson is recalled from international duty to take his place amongst the replacements.Meanwhile, in the pack, Olivier Azam comes in for Lawson at hooker and Akapusi Qera gets the nod instead of Andy Hazell who played against Irish despite being unwell.Of note amongst the replacements are the returns to the first team squad of Dave Attwood and Henry Trinder who both made playing comebacks in the A League on Monday evening.Saints have been pacesetters in the Aviva Premiership this season but went down to a 38-8 defeat at Bath last weekend, a result which Redpath knows will give Jim Mallinder’s side all the motivation they need. Darren Dawidiuk, Yann Thomas, Rupert Harden, Dave Attwood, Alasdair Strokosch, Dan Robson, Freddie Burns, Henry Trinderlast_img read more

Heineken Cup crisis: Business as usual for our Gallic cousins

first_imgThe headline of the small L’Equipe piece is ‘The European Cup on the precipice’, an accurate analysis of the crisis facing the northern hemisphere game, and the article carries suitably melodramatic words such as ‘bombshells’ and ‘claps of thunder’. There are also comments from Paul Goze, president of the Ligue nationale de rugby (LNR), the governing body in charge of the Top 14 in France, accusing “the Celts of playing a stalling game” and declaring that a result the French and English clubs “will pass to plan B”.Plan B is the breakaway Anglo-French cup proposed on Tuesday, and which has caused such consternation north of the Channel. But in the same L’Equipe article Jean-Pierre Lux, president of the ERC, rubbishes the idea. “An Anglo-French competition will never be organised,” he declares. “To organise a cross-border competition, one must have the agreement of the IRB. And a body already exists to organise a European Cup – it’s the ERC. Huge legal problems would follow if another entity came into being.” Fan support: French fans love the Heineken CupStrong words, so why such a muted reaction in France? Because rugby ruptures are hardly uncommon this side of the Channel. The LNR and FFR have been at each other’s throats for what seems like an eternity in a bitter squabble over club versus country; the clubs regularly fall out with the LNR; coaches are fired by clubs; players threaten to go on strike; refs get abused by players and coach, and last, but not least, there are the perpetual financial woes plaguing the French domestic game that in recent seasons have led to the expulsion of Montauban and Bourgoin from the top echelons.There are only so many toys that can be thrown out of the pram.The feelings of the French to the latest crisis to hit the game was best summed up by a message posted on rugbyrama.fr, the internet site of the excellent Midi Olympique. “One of the rare times when we see the English and French clubs agree is when it’s a question of big bucks.” Au revoir: A French side are Heineken Cup holders but it hasn’t stopped them agitating for a new competitionBy Gavin MortimerHEINEKEN CUP hell may have broken loose in the British Isles but on the south side of the English Channel Tuesday’s news of the tournament’s likely demise has caused barely a ripple.There is nothing about it in the French national press, not in Liberation, nor Aujourd’hui en France, not even in Direct Matin, the country’s nearest equivalent to The Metro. Instead the sports pages are dominated by the French football’s team defeat of Belarus in last night’s World Cup qualifier.Lottery: Who knows where the Celtic sides will end upL’Equipe, the daily paper dedicated to sport, did carry the news, tucked away at the bottom of page 13, under a half-page profile of Bordeaux prop Jean-Baptiste Poux in which he states: “I’m not Chabal or Michalak.” Whatever. Clermont Auvergne’s supporters cheer their team on the Place de Jaude in the center of Clermont-Ferrand, central France, on May 18, 2013, as they watch the direct broadcast of the European Cup final rugby union match between Clermont-Ferrand and Toulon, played in Dublin. AFP PHOTO / THIERRY ZOCCOLAN (Photo credit should read THIERRY ZOCCOLAN/AFP/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Hotshots: Meet young Wasps rugby star Liam O’Neill

first_imgRW Verdict: Wasps expect big things of their 19-year-old wing/full-back. Billy Whizz is a terrific role model for him.Want to keep up to date with the latest upcoming rugby stars? Why not subscribe to Rugby World? Click here for all the latest deals. How did you get involved with rugby?I went to my local club, Old Leamingtonians, when I was seven. My brother had been there for a few years, so I decided to give it a go. At 13 I moved to Stratford-Upon-Avon, staying until 16. After that I got involved in the Wasps Academy.Which coaches have helped you the most? Neil Hobday at Stratford, Dorian Ward – still Mr Ward! – at school andmore recently Rob Smith.Who was your playing role model? Jason Robinson. He was such a fast guy and full-back is my favourite position, so there was a lot I learnt from watching him. Sting in tact: O’Neill makes a break at the Premiership Rugby Sevens LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS What’s been your highlight so far?Last year I was on loan at Henley and we won the league, which was special.What are your aims for the new season? To break into the first XV. But also to carry on my personal progression. If I can keep that up then hopefully representative rugby will come later.last_img read more

England 27-14 Argentina: Five talking points

first_imgCourtney Lawes has epitomised this in his showings over the autumn, not least so against Argentina at the weekend. His forcible tackles prevented Argentina from getting over the gain line and breaking open an England defence that was stretched numerically for 70 minutes.Everyone expects Maro Itoje to take the jersey back when he returns to fitness and he should, but it’s worth noting his replacement has done everything that has been asked of him.Similarly, the likes of Tom Wood, Teimana Harrison, Rokoduguni, Goode and Daly – at outside centre – have all fitted in well when called upon this month. There have not been the signs of disruption or a lessening in quality that have accompanied England’s injury-enforced changes in years gone by.With Itoje, Haskell, Anthony Watson and Jack Nowell all to return in the coming months, Manu Tuilagi already back in Leicester’s team and the uncapped and currently injured duo of Sam Jones and Mike Williams in England’s sights, Jones’ depth of options continues to grow.Highs, lows and more inconsistency at the scrumThe scrum has been an unpredictable aspect of England’s play in 2016.It has ranged from a powerful unit capable of dominating to an Achilles’ heel that has plagued England’s desire to put speed and width on the ball. It was no different against Argentina.The front row of Mako Vunipola, Dylan Hartley and Dan Cole struggled to deal with Argentina in the first half, with the Pumas having a clear advantage. This is not a vintage Argentinean scrummaging front row, either, but anytime you have to deal with a bajada-employing Pumas pack spearheaded by the talented Agustín Creevy, it’s an area of the game where you can be found wanting.England struggled to strike the ball quickly and hold up to the pressure that the Argentineans were exerting on them, something which culminated in Cole being sent to the sin-bin late in the first half.It should be noted this improved dramatically when Joe Marler and Jamie George joined Cole in the front row in the second half, albeit against the second-string Argentinean front row. George was quickly able to get his heel to the ball and then focus on shifting his weight and power to moving the scrum forward.The Saracens front rower is continuing to bang on Jones’ door with all the gusto of a, well, hungry hooker.Numbers game: Argentina failed to make any advantage countArgentina’s woesFor all the eulogising that England’s defence and resilience deserves from that game, Argentina coach Daniel Hourcade has every right to be incensed by his side’s performance.The match may have finished with 13 men versus 13 men, but for vast swathes of it, Argentina had one or two-men advantages and come the end of 80 minutes, it was the Pumas that looked out on their feet, whilst England’s line speed in defence continued to cause them problems. With England having to make three times the amount of tackles Argentina did, there was no excuse for the lack of problems Argentina were able pose England, with the last few minutes of the first half and the first few minutes of the second half the obvious exceptions.It’s been a long and draining season for the Pumas but the handling mistakes, decision-making errors and poor one-on-one tackling all fell well below the standards that the Argentinean players usually hold themselves to. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Alex Shawcenter_img If you were still awaiting that elusive, complete performance from England under Eddie Jones, that idealised 80 minutes of rugby where every facet of their game comes together and they put the opposition to the sword, your wait continued this weekend. What occurred on Saturday, when England beat Argentina 27-14 at Twickenham, was, however, the best performance that the hosts have turned in under the tutelage of the Australian. Or at least in the opinion of this writer.Having been reduced to 14 men when Elliot Daly saw red in the 5th minute of the game, England faced an uphill battle for the remaining 75 minutes but dealt with the challenge through a combination of outstanding defence, an efficient lineout and good game management.We run through five of the key takeaways for Jones and his coaching staff from an entertaining and dramatic encounter on Saturday afternoon.Back three balanceIt is fair to say plenty of eyebrows were raised by the omission of Semesa Rokoduguni for this match and, to a lesser extent, the decision to also send Alex Goode back to his club. Jonny May and Mike Brown returned to the XV and both put on masterful performances under extremely difficult circumstances.Where the issues in the back three came were on the left wing, where outside centre Daly was made to look like a man playing out of position. His collision with an in-air Leonardo Senatore bore no malice or intent but it was a justified red card.Long walk: Elliot Daly leaves the field after his red cardChasing and competing for kicks is a skill that wingers practice relentlessly over their careers but it is not something centres will spend anywhere near as much time on training ground working on.Jones may have compared Daly to Jason Robinson in the week running up to the game and his potential in the back three is clear but the Test arena is not the ideal place to be learning and developing these skills.Return of KruisKruis’ return from injury was critical to – and representative of – a much-improved defensive performance from England.With Kruis, Maro Itoje and James Haskell all missing against South Africa and Fiji, England were shorn of three of their most vocal and effective defensive communicators. At times versus both of those sides, Chris Robshaw and Owen Farrell were lone voices trying to organise their side’s defence, both at the ruck and further out.The Saracens lock did not miss a beat in his first game back from ankle surgery and reassumed his mantle of a defensive general within the England set-up. He helped take England’s driving lineout to the next level, too, which helped them control the clock and sap energy from an Argentinean side that had a man advantage for most of the game.It’s a bold assumption, but I don’t think England win this game without the defensive nous of Kruis back in the second row.It was also a coming of age game for Paul Gustard as a Test coach.Big pressence: Courtney Lawes attracts Argentine defendersEngland developing ‘plug and play’ depthIf the All Blacks are lauded for one thing above all others, it’s arguably their ability to plug and play back-ups, young budding stars or even long-time journeymen into their first-choice squad and still maintain their high level of performance.It’s something that England are taking strides with in each game that passes under Jones’ stewardship. Free and clear: Jonny May races to a score as England beat Argentina last_img read more

Rugby World Cup 2019: One week in Kanagawa

first_imgHeading to the World Cup later this year? Find out how to make the most of your time in Kanagawa TAGS: Japan What a view! Lake Ashi with Mount Fuji in the background Advertising FeatureRugby World Cup 2019: One week in KanagawaThe World Cup will reach its climax in Yokohama and there is plenty to do in the surrounding prefecture – as this itinerary shows…DAY 1Start your Kanagawa journey in style by taking a Romancecar on the Odakyu Railway from Tokyo to Hakone (purchase a Hakone Freepass to save money on public transport).Then explore the area via the Hakone Ropeway – try black eggs in Owakudani (legend has it that eating one will add seven years to your life!) and view Mount Fuji from Togendai.Lake Ashi has a stunning view of the peak, too, and is home to the Hakone Shrine. Stay in a ryokan (traditional Japanese inn) and enjoy the hot springs (above).DAY 2After looking around Hakone town – the Okada Museum includes a lot of Eastern art and there are local crafts to see – travel to Odawara, a half-hour train ride away. Visit the impressive Odawara Castle, where you can also partake in ninja and samurai experiences.Impressive: Odawara CastleDAY 3Travel from Odawara to Oyama (again, you can save money by buying an Oyama Freepass) and have lunch around Koma Sando, a street selling a plethora of crafts from the region and housing many restaurants, with Oyama tofu a speciality.Worth a visit: Afuri ShrineTake the cable car to Afuri Shrine, where there is also an amazing view of Sagami Bay, and stay overnight on Enoshima Island, where you can enjoy fresh seafood for dinner. DAY 4An Enoshima One-day Passport will allow you to travel around the island easily. Visit Enoshima Shrine and then head to the Katase area, where you’ll find one of the closest beaches to Tokyo and an aquarium full of fascinating creatures.Take the train to Shichirigahama and stay in the scenic coastal area.For more information, visit trip.pref.kanagawa.jpDAY 5Head to Hase by rail and take in the sight of the magnificent Kamakura Buddha at Kotokuin Temple. It stands at 37 feet and is an iconic figure in the region.Move on to Kamakura to have lunch on Komachi Street, then visit the Masamune Sword and Blade Workshop, with a history that dates back 700 years.Giant-size: Kamakura BuddhaLater, visit Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine and walk to Kita-Kamakura. Follow that with a relaxing Zazen meditation or Iaido martial art experience in Kamakura.Travel to the Minato Mirai area of Yokohama ahead of the match day(s).DAY 6Channel your inner chef at Yokohama’s Cup Noodles Museum by creating your own flavour and then enjoy a walk around the beautiful Sankei-en Garden.Pre- or post-match, the place to go bar-hopping is the Noge district, which has more than 600 restaurants and bars. Purchase Noge-Tegata – vouchers for food and drinks – to use in around 70 izakaya (Japanese pubs) in the area.DAY 7 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Make the most of your final day by checking out the Minato Mirai area – you could also take a cruise – and shop in Yoshimuraya, where you should try Yokohama iekei ramen, a ‘home-style’ dish that now has a cult following.Night lights: Minato Mirailast_img read more

Rugby World magazine’s 50 Most Influential People in Rugby special

first_img Rugby World magazine’s 50 Most Influential People in Rugby specialThe latest issue of Rugby World magazine does exactly what it says on the cover: reveals the 50 Most Influential People in Rugby in 2020.If you can’t get to the shops to buy a copy, you can now order single issues online and get the magazine delivered direct to your door – click here and select Rugby World’s Aug-20 issue.Or you can find out how to download the digital edition to your tablet here. We also have incredible subscription offers, including three issues for just £5 – find out more here.Here are ten reasons to buy Rugby World magazine’s August 2020 edition…1. The 50 Most Influential People in RugbyThis is the ultimate list of rugby’s movers and shakers. Some names will be familiar – like Siya Kolisi in top spot – and others will not, but it’s a definitive look at the people who shape the game.The detailed and comprehensive rundown, which covers 35 pages, is sure to provoke plenty of debate, so make sure you let us know what you think by getting in touch via social media or emailing [email protected] Steve BorthwickThe former England lock has now taken over as Leicester head coach – and Sean Holley explains why he will revive the Tigers in The Analyst.3. Scrums debateShould the match clock stop for scrums? Former international props Ben Alexander and Rocky Clark present their case on either side of the argument.Mind the gap: Alev Kelter, of the USA, makes a break on the sevens circuit (Getty Images)4. Sevens SpecialThe latest on sevens at the Olympics, an exclusive interview with the USA’s Alev Kelter on swapping ice hockey for rugby, and insight from four kingpins of the men’s circuit. TAGS: Highlight 5. Rising Stars of Super RugbyFind out more about Blues No 8 Hoskins Sotutu and Crusaders full-back Will Jordan, who have both been impressing in Super Rugby Aotearoa. Plus, we talk to Crusaders coach Scott Robertson.6. Hard-hitting opinionFormer England scrum-half Kyran Bracken gives his thoughts on all things Premiership – the salary cap, marquee players, relegation…Fijian flair: Semi Radradra on the attack against Wales at RWC 2019 (Getty Images)7. Semi RadradraHe’s wowed fans in league and union, for club and country, and now the Fijian is about to unleash his magic for Bristol Bears in the Premiership. We find out what fans can expect.8. Dave RennieThere is lots of negativity around Australian rugby right now, but the new Wallabies coach hopes to turn that around, as he explains in this exclusive interview.9. Mark Evans on Japan“The Japanese market represents the next big thing for rugby.” The Global Rapid Rugby CEO looks at why Japan is crucial to the game’s future.Youth centre: Action from the Junior National 7s Championship at Panjab University in India (Getty Images)10. Rugby in IndiaRugby is growing fast in India, particularly in rural areas, but the sport has challenges to overcome in the country too. Charles Inglefield brings us a special report. The August 2020 issue contains our biennial countdown of the game’s movers and shakers center_img Plus, there’s all this…Full-back tips from Felix JonesWorld Cup 2021 qualifying updateNational Hero: Japan captain Michael LeitchThe Secret Player on French ownersDowntime with… USA sevens star Perry BakerA kicking rant from ex-Scotland full-back Ian SmithThe August 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine is on sale until 3 August 2020.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

The in-game stat from Gloucester v Harlequins blowing people’s minds

first_imgCan’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. It was not a good day at the office for Gloucester. Surely that stat can’t be right? Wtf were they doing? #GLOvHAR @OptaPro [email protected] ? @thedeadballarea ? @daviesGDD ? pic.twitter.com/AxjFA9qfdL— Brett Igoe (@brettruganalyst) September 14, 2020It illustrates a match in which Glaws dropped balls with the try-line begging, when Danny Cipriani threw a forward pass to Jonny May when a score looked a certainty, and with scrum-half Stephen Varney throwing an intercept to Quins skipper Stephan Lewies, who romped in for a score. This is one of the most amazing in-game stats I’ve ever seen, given the score pic.twitter.com/uHVZGkjovH— NESW2019 (@nesw2019) September 14, 2020According to the graphic, at 10-28 down, with 65 minutes played, Gloucester had still put together 46 phases in Quins’ 22. Going the other way, Quins had only needed one phase to hit the 28 points mark.It cannot be right, sure? Some others questioned the mad figure. He is unquestionably the solution but there also needs to be balance between playing up front and through 10. If he isn’t making good decisions then he shouldn’t be given the ball for a few plays everything going through 10 is so predictable for the top teams to shut down.— Lawrence Dallaglio (@dallaglio8) September 15, 2020After the game, Gloucester boss George Skivington said: “It was definitely our worst performance since I’ve arrived at the club. “We set ourselves up so many times to score points, but we just failed at the last hurdle with the execution. A lot of the things that have been good for us in the last few games weren’t tonight.”It will be particularly disappointing as the club’s famous supporters were back (in part) to see their team.Big return: A thousand fans were allowed at Kingsholm (Getty Images)It was also notable that British & Irish Lions head coach Warren Gatland was at the game. With Lions operations manager Alan Phillips beside him, they were casting an eye over some of the talent that could be available to them for the 2021 tour to South Africa.Eyes up: Warren Gatland, the British & Irish Lions boss, was there (Getty Images)As the Lions boss embarks on more games around Europe, some of Gloucester’s stars may be wishing that they get another chance in front of him, to show what they’ve got. The in-game stat from Gloucester v Harlequins blowing people’s mindsIt was meant to be a brilliant return for Gloucester fans, as 1000 Cherry and White supporters were allowed back into Kingsholm last night. But the home side failed to spark as Harlequins nabbeded themselves a top eight place in the Gallagher Premiership, earning them a Champions Cup spot next season.Losing 28-15 at home would be galling enough too, but amidst Gloucester’s wasteful play this one in-game stat came up on BT Sport’s coverage. You would be forgiven if it made your head hurt. With fans back and the Lions boss there too, it was all go at Kingsholm Disbelieving: Danny Cipriani of Gloucester looks on (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Seminarians create interfaith chaplaincy ministry in Occupy Austin

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminarians create interfaith chaplaincy ministry in Occupy Austin Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA December 6, 2011 at 9:44 pm I was on my way to lunch with coworkers when I saw the seminarians ministering to Occupy Austin in the rain. I am proud of them for being there! Theological Education Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Laurie Eiserloh says: Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Occupy Movement, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Bob KinneyPosted Dec 6, 2011 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group center_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Photo/Jessie Vendati[Episcopal News Service] Seminarians in Austin, Texas, are “taking the gospel to the streets” as an interfaith chaplaincy ministry to those participating in Occupy Austin.“I am proud of the campus chapter of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship (EPF) at the Seminary of the Southwest. They are taking the gospel to the streets and exemplify the growing influence young adults are having in our nationwide social justice work,” said the Rev. Jackie Lynn, EPF executive director.Several seminarians – some donning monkish robes – went to the downtown Austin Occupy site the Monday before Thanksgiving to pass out food and pray with the occupiers. Their first weekly Sunday prayer service was held at the site six days later.The Episcopal Peace Fellowship’s website – www.epfnational.org – has an article written by Erin Warde, a seminarian from the Central Gulf Coast, about her group’s first day in Occupy Austin.“Using the diocesan-supported Occupy chaplaincy in Boston as an example, I thought our EPF chapter on the seminary campus could prayerfully participate in Occupy Austin,” said Jessie Vendati, chapter president, member of the EPF’s national executive council and third year divinity student from the Diocese of Olympia.“Many seminarians began talking on campus about the church’s role in economic and social justice and we welcome students from other Austin seminaries, as well as the wider faith communities in Austin,” said Vendati, who was a Catholic Worker in Tacoma, Washington, before entering seminary in Austin.While Union Theological Seminary in New York City supported its students participating in Occupy Wall Street, Seminary of the Southwest is “the first Episcopal seminary to take part in the Occupy Movement,” Vendati said. “Many faculty and our academic dean have been very supportive as we honor the legacy of our seminary’s founder.”The late John E. Hines, elected presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church in 1964 and a compelling advocate for racial and social justice, founded the Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest when he was suffragan bishop of Texas after World War II. “A leader of iron nerve, integrity and conviction, [he] courageously guided his church through a turbulent decade,” wrote the Rev. Ken Kesselus in his book John E. Hines – Granite on Fire. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Comments (1) Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Virginia court tells breakaway congregations to return property

first_img January 16, 2012 at 3:20 pm Perhaps Rev. Gentry is overlooking the reality that, in the Episcopal tradition, the property in question is not so much the home of the current congregation, as he puts it, but the seat of a multi-generational parish. We are not congregationalist in nature! Those who have contributed toward the building and upkeep of these parish properties throughout many generations since the American Revolution, did so in the interests of the long-term integrity of the parish and the Episcopal Church. And by the way, as Episcopalians AND good Americans, I suspect that those generations of the past would have been appalled at the thought of their parish being referred to as “Anglican”, and with the prospect of official subservience to a foreign ecclesiastical authority (Nigerian, in this case). Finally, deep seated hurt and anger would seem to me to be the expected fruits for those who enter disputes supposing themselves righteously and absolutely correct and who further function without compromise. My children often expressed deep seated hurt and anger when their immediate need-of-the-moment was thwarted! Doug Desper says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Editor’s note: Updated Jan. 12, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. EST with additional reaction and to remove reference to old press release. [Episcopal News Service] A Fairfax County, Virginia, court has told seven breakaway congregations that they must return control of church property to the Diocese of Virginia and the Episcopal Church.The majority of members and clergy of those parishes left to form congregations of the Convocation of Anglicans in North America (CANA), which the Anglican Province of Nigeria began in 2005. The departing members of those congregations then filed claims to parish property under Virginia law.Judge Randy I. Bellows said in a letter opinion issued late on Jan. 10 that the diocese and the Episcopal Church “have a contractual and proprietary interest in the property of these Episcopal churches” and added that while congregations “had an absolute right to depart from [the Episcopal Church] and the diocese, they had no right to take these seven Episcopal churches with them.”Bellows’ decision stemmed from a June 2010 decision of the Virginia Supreme Court that said he erred in an earlier ruling when he said that the breakaway congregations involved in the cases were entitled to retain all the parishes’ real and personal property when they left the Episcopal Church and joined another denomination.In coming to his opinion, Bellows reviewed Virginia statutes governing church property, the deeds to the real property of the churches, the governing rules of the diocese and the Episcopal Church, and the historic relationship between the parishes and the larger church.He concluded state statutes support a finding that a local congregation is obligated to comply with the “laws, rules and ecclesiastical polity” of the denomination with regard to property and that the constitution and canons of both the diocese and the Episcopal Church “demonstrate pervasive dominion, management, and control over local church property, in a manner normally associated with ownership, title, and possession.” Bellows said the deeds in question make clear that the property “cannot be removed from the denomination without the larger church’s consent.”And, Bellows listed 20 ways in which each of the parishes throughout their history, until the time many of their congregants broke away, acknowledged the authority of the diocese and the larger church. He also cited numerous ways specific to each of the parishes in which their so-called “course of dealings” showed them to be subordinate parts of the Episcopal Church.Bellows said that all personal property acquired by the congregations before Jan. 31, 2007, or Feb. 1, 2007, (depending on the congregation) must be returned and all liquid personal property (e.g., contributions and donations of money) acquired after those dates will remain with the breakaway congregations. Any tangible personal property the congregations acquired after those dates must be given to the diocese and the Episcopal Church unless the congregations can prove that they were donated to them after those dates or purchased solely with money received after those dates.The text of the 113-page ruling is here.“Our goal throughout this litigation has been to return faithful Episcopalians to their church homes and Episcopal properties to the mission of the church,” Virginia Bishop Shannon S. Johnston said in a statement after the ruling. “While we are grateful for the decision in our favor, we remain mindful of the toll this litigation has taken on all parties involved, and we continue to pray for all affected by the litigation.”Henry D.W. Burt, secretary of the diocese and chief of staff, said in the same statement that “we hope that this ruling will lead to our congregations returning to worship in their church homes in the near future, while finding a way to support the CANA congregations as they plan their transition.”The Rev. Canon Charles Robertson, canon to the presiding bishop and primate, said Jan. 11 that “I give thanks with the people of the Diocese of Virginia for the recent court decision, and even more for their passionate commitment to the mission of the church. And I join Bishop Johnston in calling us to pray for all those who have experienced the struggles of this litigation.”Meanwhile, Jim Oakes, chairman of the Anglican District of Virginia, which is the umbrella organization for the Anglican congregations, said in a Jan. 10 press release issued by the breakaway Falls Church that “we are profoundly disappointed by today’s decision.”He offered “our gratitude to Judge Bellows for his review of this case. As we prayerfully consider our legal options, we above all remain steadfast in our effort to defend the historic Christian faith. Regardless of today’s ruling, we are confident that God is in control, and that He will continue to guide our path.”The Rev. John Yates, rector of the breakaway Falls Church, said in the same press release that “the core issue for us is not physical property, but theological and moral truth and the intellectual integrity of faith in the modern world.”“Wherever we worship, we remain Anglicans because we cannot compromise our historic faith. Like our spiritual forebears in the Reformation, ‘Here we stand. So help us God. We can do no other.’”CANA Missionary Bishop Martyn Minns called the ruling “a great disappointment to me.”“We all know that Christ’s church is built in the hearts of men, women, and children – not in stones, bricks and mortar no matter how historical, beautiful, or valuable,” he said Jan. 11. “But there are so many personal connections to the buildings that will likely be disrupted by the potential loss of these properties: baptisms performed, marriages celebrated, and funerals remembered.”In June 2010, the Supreme Court held that although disagreements had caused “a division” within the Episcopal Church and the Diocese of Virginia, the breakaway congregations had affiliated with a church that was not a branch of either the Episcopal Church or the diocese. Such an affiliation is required, the court said, for Virginia’s one-of-a-kind “Division Statute” (Section 57-9(A)) to apply, as the breakaway congregations claimed.The Supreme Court returned the cases to the lower court for further proceedings to resolve the property claims of the Episcopal Church and the diocese “under principles of real property and contract law.” Bellows held a trial that lasted 22 days stretched over April, May and June 2011, and included testimony by 60 witnesses. He wrote that he also reviewed thousands of pages of post-trial briefs.In the Jan. 10 ruling, Bellows gave the diocese and the Episcopal Church 45 days to submit a proposed order to enforce his ruling on returning the property. The CANA congregations are to be given “a reasonable opportunity to note their exceptions,” he said, and he gave all the parties 30 days from Jan. 10 to request a hearing on the terms of the proposed order.More information about the cases, including all court filings, is available here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Press Release christina mccan says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Matthew Schettler says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 January 12, 2012 at 8:23 am I am not an Episcopalian but as a fellow Christian I would strongly advise the Diocese and the Episcopal Church to consider the long term impact of this very sad legal struggle. I am told by my Presbyterian friends that they have found it to be a benefit ultimately for all parties to simply allow departing congregations, if there is a two thirds majority of parishioners who so request retention of the physical property , to retain that property. Otherwise I am told the deep seated hurt and anger felt by the local congregation just festers and grows not to mention that it gives the appearance that the monetary value of the property is more important than the reasons for the separation! Let’s face it the Christian “Church” already has a reputation of placing money over person! Matthew Schettler says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Property Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rev. Andrew Gerales Gentry says: Michael N Isham says: January 13, 2012 at 12:40 am You’re right, Christina. God loves all of us; all of His creation. Why else would He send His Son to bleed and die a horrific death on the cross? But by saying that it is foolish to “rely on a statement in the bible made by a Jewish people 3,000 years ago,” you are denying God’s love for us; denying the Death and Resurrection of Jesus Christ. If it is foolish to rely on the word of God spoken in the Old Testament, then why should it be any less foolish to rely on the word of God, the saving message of Jesus Christ, spoken of in the New Testament. 2 Timothy 3:16 states:“All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness.”If all Scripture (both Old and New Testaments) is God-breathed (inspired), than how can any of it be false?In his New Testament epistles, Paul decries homosexuality in both Romans 1:26-27 and I Corinthians 6:9-11, among other places. Both forbid against homosexual activities. In his Epistle to the Corinthians, Paul writes:“Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: neither the sexually immoral, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor men who practice homosexuality, nor thieves, nor the greedy, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. And such were some of you. But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God”That list of sins pretty much rules all of out of salvation but, as you said, God has love for all his creation. He doesn’t give us license to “sin and sin boldly” (Rom. 7:19), but he calls us to repentance, and to receive forgiveness in the administration of the Sacraments. January 12, 2012 at 5:55 pm The break away congregants have ignored the belief that God created us and loves us. There are no qualifiers in that concept. God would not create an abomination, thus homophobic people are denying God’s creation and God’s love for all creation. It is foolish to rely on a statement in the bible made by a Jewish people 3,000 years ago. I think we in the present age understand God,’s love, especially through the Christian Bible, which includes a new covenant. Jesus did change things and the strict laws of Leviticus was one of those things. January 20, 2012 at 3:26 pm First of all, I use the English Standard Version of the Bible. But, since you brought it up, the Greek word in question is “arsenokoitēs” which has been translated anywhere from “male prostitution” to “men who practice homosexuality.” There are exciting arguments on both sides of the translation, and I encourage you to check them out.As for the parable of the mustard seed, John A. Sproule of Grace Theological Seminary wrote an excellent essay entitled “The Problem of the Mustard Seed” which deals directly with that piece of text. A quick Google search will take you to the article in question. I see no reason why not to take that passage, along with the entirety of Scripture, literally. Michael N Isham says: Submit an Event Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books January 29, 2012 at 9:28 am Peace and harmony prevailing is what I desire to live as a Christian living in an Episcopal Church.The peace of Christ and harmony in following the Holy Scriptures celebrating as we are instructed.We come to Eucharist in reconcilliation. Doug Desper says: January 21, 2012 at 2:03 pm As a child and as a young man, I was taught that the “nigra” was an inferior being to we pasty whites, and that the attempt within the church to restore as sense of equality in the matter was the work of liberals (and probably communists) within the church leadership who were bent on destroying we conservative parishioners who knew better. Like I suspect that you have done above, Mr. Desper, they spoke from their guts with deep emotion and mistook their human cultural mores for God-inspired truth. While I report that I now find this mindset ludicrous, I’m saddened to report that, at the time, I believed them.As a student of church history, I have found that matters of questionable bishops, definitions of marriage, trinitarian dogma, and theological certainties have ALWAYS been with us. While I acknowledge that you believe that the ecclesiastical sky is falling in, what has changed? We have survived thus far have we not?Now I must ask, having once been fooled by the likes of your well-meaning invective, why should I believe you? If 99.9% of your group jump into the sea of schism, I trust you will feel yourself in good company. But why should I follow? Just as with the issues of slavery and racial equality of the past, I believe that one hundred years hence will find you and your ilk sadly wrong. January 31, 2012 at 9:57 am I am glad that Judge Bellows has ruled for the Diocese of Virginia and the historic Fairfax parishes. It would appear that physical structures are of greater than passing importance to the fair adjudication of this case. Just as our bodies have a sacramental character, so too our bricks and mortar. It is a gnostic mistake to dismiss church property as an inferior, anti-missionary encumbrance. We can credit the breakaways with faithfulness of conscience, and we can pray for the healing of the Episcopal Church. JoeHerring, Diocese of Atlanta, Alpharetta, GA Virginia court tells breakaway congregations to return property Matthew Schettler says: Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA January 16, 2012 at 9:44 pm Break-awayers have every right to break away.. they just should not take the building and church appointments, records with them.. If they no longer wish to be Episcopalian that is fine but you cannot have it both ways.. January 20, 2012 at 5:23 pm You take the ‘entirety of Scripture literally’? Really. How about the parables? Was there an actual ‘sower who went forth to sow’, and if there wasn’t, does that mean the parable contains no truth? How about Revelation? Does Jesus have an actual sword in his mouth and snow white hair? How about the Psalms? Does God have breasts and wings?You believe that the Bible is free of metaphor, symbolism, poetry? You are equating ‘truth’ with ‘literal reading/interpretation.’ What an impoverished, limiting, and unsatisfactory view. Comments (25) Matthew Schettler says: Richard Angelo says: January 11, 2012 at 10:09 pm I am in alignment with the “break aways” in that they are truly the ones who have stayed true to Christian doctrine. However, I have never supported the leadership of CANA fighting for these properties. While the shepherds fought for the lands, the sheep scattered and suffered and were attacked.I am a man who has suffered through divorce. I know that sometimes “the other” chooses to not follow the vows of the union. Such is the case with TEC. As in Amos 3:3, “Can two walk together unless they have agreed?” No. Yet, when faced with one who has chosen to walk a wayward path, what is one to do? Having seen the judgmental nature of many in “the church” towards those who are divorced I wondered if the great minds and learned spirits of CANA leadership would behave as Christ or as men. My observation is that they fell far short of the glory of God and acted mostly as men, relying on the law which never sets man free.When divorce happens and people focus on the “things”, the children suffer. When this schism happened and CANA focused on the “things”, the people suffered. When CANA quite appropriately and righteously stood up and said that the doctrine being followed by TEC was no longer Christian, they indeed should have walked out and took the congregations with them. Had they done that the new congregations (and the new buildings) would be flourishing and the ones left holding the buildings of the past, would have collapsed as predicted now under the weight of the costs of maintenance. Yet, like Lot’s wife, the TEC leaders looked back, longed for the buildings, longed for the past, longed for the slavery, just as the people of Israel did when they were in the desert. They became blind guides focused on the properties rather than the real church, which is the people. They have failed many. I pray they can now focus on what is of interest to God, people’s lives, their salvation, and their sanctification.The God we serve not only owns the cattle on a thousand hills, but the hills themselves. May the shepherds repent and get back to tending to their flocks.Christopher James Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rev Joe D Herring says: Michael N Isham says: Doug Desper says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET January 20, 2012 at 3:53 pm This was never even an issue until TEC started to bleed congregations in the 1960s and 1970s due to the rise of liberalism and higher critical methods of interpretation ultimately culminating in the ordination of women in 1976. The “Dennis Canon,” passed in 1979, established the “inter-generational trust” that TEC holds to today. There is nothing historical about this canon; it is merely reactionary.You also suspect that the generations of the Saints passed would be “appalled at the thought of their parish being referred to as “Anglican”, and with the prospect of official subservience to a foreign ecclesiastical authority .” That may be so, but I’m sure that they would have been even more appalled by the teachings of TEC today. If they were exposed to TEC’s post-modern theology, they would have left the church in a heartbeat. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem January 17, 2012 at 8:52 pm Mr. Angelo, what happens when those in charge of the Church leave behind the established teachings and practice of the faith (especially of those who gave the property and goods) and pursue their own spiritual fantasies and promote them as doctrine and practice? Who left whom? When you have a several dozen or even a few hundred people leaving across the Church you have a movement. When you have thousands staying away and thousands breaking away you have a crisis. The argument of the “break-awayers” is that a narrow agenda is being pursued by significant leadership to the peril and expense of the entire Church. Who left? I would firmly state that the ones who left and are leaving are those who want to redefine marriage, claim that Jesus is a spiritual master among many, that Jesus is our way to salvation, but not the Way (and thus ignore His words), and whatever further spiritual fantasies they promote as the faith once delivered. When they began pursuing and promoting their private ideas, they left. Unfortunately the seat of power is with them – for a season. Michael N Isham says: January 21, 2012 at 2:14 pm Mr. Desper: To which “established” practices and teachings of the faith are you referring? Anglican? Romand Catholic? Orthodox? Or perhaps Baptist (oh, not them; they don’t even have bishops)? Where can I find a concise and consistent statement of these practices and teachings?Where there is a small gathering of human beings, there will be disagreement and dissent on every matter under the sun. The measure of their godliness is not whether they all agree, but the extent to which they obey the two great commandments in their disagreement! Honestly, I don’t get a sense of either of the two in you writings, Mr. Desper. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York January 15, 2012 at 7:20 pm In 2008 the denominational Faith Communities Today survey received responses from 783 Episcopal parishes. Interesting trends can be realized if our church leaders will use this information. Notice I say “If”. One glaring trend regards this discussion and will have some bearing on the next General Convention. In the survey, only 1/3 (33%) of those surveyed considered themselves as considerably or somewhat liberal. However, one can argue that most of our denominational strife centers on narrow liberalizing agendas that attempt to revise the faith and practice of the Church, whether it be the re-definining of marriage, consent to questionable bishops, communion of the unbaptized, reduction of Trinitarian language in new trial liturgies, etc. ONLY 1/3 of those surveyed would likely identify positively with these issues. Yet, our strife continues as the patience and faith of congregations continues to be tried until drastic separations happen. Now one looks with weary eyes as the General Convention will likely drive more wedges into this Church. So, if nearly 2/3 of this Church (at least 783 congregations) considers themselves more in the middle or conservative in faith and practice, why are we being led by people who are clearly pulling us apart? “Woe to the shepherds who destroy and scatter the sheep of my pasture”, says the Lord. (Jeremiah 23:1-3). By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 11, 2012 January 20, 2012 at 3:42 pm In the case of Matthew 7:3 (the log and speck), the text note in The Lutheran Study Bible (LC-MS version) provides a succinct exposition of the verse.“Jesus used a grotesque exaggeration to illustrate how absurd it was for His disciples to pick out the sins of others when they have not repented of their own.” Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Featured Eventscenter_img Rector Shreveport, LA Tags Christopher James says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ January 21, 2012 at 1:03 pm It’s very interesting that Mr. Schettler commonly uses words such as “I’m sure that” compared to my “I suspect that.” Thanks be to the Lord that he didn’t seek a position as a prosecutor: we’d all be convicted and sentenced with his omniscient certainties! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis don says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Michael N Isham says: Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs February 4, 2012 at 9:59 pm Ruling FOR the diocese now places the burden on the diocese to explain a few things:1). How can the diocese lose these thousands of members without attempting to retain them more effectively under the always-vaunted “TEC big tent”? Isn’t it easy to dismiss and villainze the breakaways at this point after they were bragged about for years as vital, growing Episcopal churches? How quickly they were stripped of their accolades when they questioned the course of the Church.2). What would possibly convince thousands of members of a diocese to leave it after having become flagship church examples? Was it the persuasive voice of a few loud priests – or could it be that the revisionist theology and practice of TEC had turned them sour? If you believe that a few loud voices soured thousands of people to TEC you effectively are saying that the laity are “sheeple”; that is, mindless and easily swayed. (That, by the way, is an insult to the abilities of these people, not to mention too easy to dismiss them with).3) How will less than 100 people showing up on Sunday take the place of 2,000 showing up (in just 1 church) that kept up the property?Congratulations to the winners. They have a lot of cleaning up to do, not the least of which is the image that will not be easily repaired for decades as the public travels by these decaying properties. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group January 16, 2012 at 4:00 pm Mr. Schettler is correct that we we aren’t “supposed” to sin, but human beings both he and I know that we do anyway, even with the gifts of faith and justification. So, Ms McCan, in the words of our Lord, shall we discuss the speck in your eye, or the log in Mr. Schettler’s? Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR January 16, 2012 at 2:02 pm You’re right, Christina. We are justified by faith, as Paul states in Romans 5:1.“Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, bwe1 have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.”However, we aren’t given the license to sin. Paul also states in Romans 3:31“Do we then overthrow the law by this faith? By no means! On the contrary, we uphold the law.”We aren’t supposed to sin just because we are given grace anew each morning (Lam. 3:23). We are supposed to uphold the law, but not be burdened by it. Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Michael N Isham says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME January 21, 2012 at 1:41 pm Again, Mr. Schettler speaks with great authority and assuredness. Though he appears to be poised to judge with quickly-engineered certainty, I and many others find ourselves all too painfully knowledgeable of our own sins and shortcomings, both those of the past and, we are assured, of the future to be functioning as a judge of others. Let Mr. Schettler’s God-generated conscience be his guide; however, as for me, I will restrain from this stiff-necked and authoritarian judgementalism! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Christina McCann says: Rector Belleville, IL January 21, 2012 at 8:58 pm Mr. Isham: Where can you find the concise teachings about who Jesus says that He is? Where can you find His definition of marriage? The Gospels. Where can you find these reiterated in a form to be taught? The Catechism. The Bible and the Prayer Book are our standards and any leader of the Episcopal Church that pursues their own spiritual journey of self-discovery in denial of the catholic faith and order delivered to this Church is a false shepherd that imperils the souls of those under their care. The Church is to transform the culture, not be the chaplains of its novelties and whims.Dr Geoffrey Fisher, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1945 to 1961, said that we Anglicans….“… have no doctrine of our own; we possess only the doctrine of the Catholic Church.”A great deal of our current distress as we hemorrhage members and resources is that too many people have not been taught the faith as received by this Church, but instead have embarked on a journey to find a faith and practice agreeable to their circumstances. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 January 21, 2012 at 1:31 pm Again, Mr. Schettler speaks with presumed omniscience when he quotes St. Paul as decrying “homosexuality” when such a word is neither used in the ESV, nor was such a word in existence until, probably, the 19th century. While I had not been familiar with this translation of the scriptures, my recent review found it to be essentially in keeping with nearly all others. In the reading of the passages of Romans that Mr. Schelttler quotes. I am more in keeping with former President Carter’s view, who I suspect may be viewed as another heretic by Mr. Schettler, that the essential point of Paul’s words here were that the sexual interactions described were ones that were entirely of lust, with no loving regard for their sexual partners. While I will acknowledge that this predicament seems to be more common among those in the gay community, it is certainly not rare among straight people. And who among us, including Mr. Schettler AND myself, has not been guilty of this behavior, even with our committed, monogamous partners?Mr. Schettler responds to my question concerning his use of the Greek text with an adroitly executed game of intellectual dodge ball. His discourse on “arsenokoitēs” is factually correct, but one that appears to be excerpted from another’s writings. Forgive me should I be wrong, but it would appear that Mr. Schettler is presenting another’s conclusions as his own. Again, does he personally use the Greek text in his readings of the NT? If so, I honor his abilities in this regard.In spite of my disagreement with Mr. Schettler’s positions on these matters, I very much respect both him and his viewpoints. There are members of my extended family that hold similar opinions, and I love them dearly. However, I’d be more comfortable with Mr. Schettler’s views would that he make better use of words such as “I believe” vs what appears to be a heavy-handed sense of “I know.” Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Charles Daily says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET January 16, 2012 at 3:52 pm I’m very puzzled which version of Christian scriptures Mr. Schettler used when quoting the word “homsexuality”? I have referenced five very common English language versions and seem not to have found that word! Perhaps Mr. Schettler is personally translating from his Greek language NT?And in response to Mr. Schettler’s concern about scriptural absolutes, in Mark 4, verse 31 our Lord is quoted as saying, “It is like the mustard which, when sown upon the ground, is the smallest of all the seeds on earth……” Having personally seen smaller seeds than the mustard seed, I could conclude that Jesus made an incorrect statement; however, regardless of the accuracy of the statement, I believe that His parable stands as one of great truth! As my mother once told me, “Come to me having perfected the first and second commandments of Christ, and then we’ll talk about the specifics of the rest!” Doug Desper says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel January 14, 2012 at 9:29 pm “But you [sinners] were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and by the Spirit of our God” Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Michael N Isham says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Michael N Isham says: Matthew Schettler says: Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more

Act for God’s dream, Presiding Bishop tells convention Eucharist

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] At the midpoint of General Convention, thousands gathered at the J.W. Marriott Hotel here for the July 8 Festival Eucharist and United Thank Offering Ingathering.A choir of several hundred voices, drawn from congregations of the Diocese of Indianapolis, along with organ and brass choir, performed anthems as the congregation gathered. Bishops, UTO representatives and international and ecumenical guests entered the vast and crowded ballroom to the hymn “Christ is made the sure foundation,” with a tune by 17th-century composer Henry Purcell. Other music was by early 20th-century English composer Ralph Vaughan Williams and 21st-century composers Joel Martinson of Dallas, Craig Phillips of Los Angeles and Frank Boles of St. Paul’s Church, Indianapolis.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori preached a message focusing on unity in diversity, mission and a call to action.“A prophet is simply somebody sent to speak for God, to tell it like it really is. Sometimes prophets speak words of comfort and strength … and sometimes the prophet speaks words that are harder to hear, reminding us that we’re supposed to love God … and love our neighbors as ourselves, said Jefferts Schori. “Words matter profoundly, and as Christians we affirm that every time we gather to give thanks for the frontier crossing incarnate Word in our midst.”Prophets speak and act for God, with spoken and incarnate words of strength, hope, and challenge, said the presiding bishop, adding that that ministry comes in many forms. “Today we’re going to give thanks for the prophetic work of the United Thank Offering, reaching out in creative possibility around the globe.”Calling everyone to act on their faith, Jefferts Schori said: “When Jesus lays on hands and heals a few, even in a place that doesn’t think he’s got much to offer, he’s doing something prophetic … What about your hands? They, too, are instruments of healing, reconciling, re-creation – let’s see those hands!”Jefferts Schori drew a parallel between the mission entrusted by Jesus to the Apostles and God’s mission today. “When Jesus goes off to other villages to teach, he is using words and hands in prophetic ways, announcing the reign of God close at hand, feeding, healing and drawing people into community,” she said. The “five marks of mission are the work and mark of prophets, of all Jesus’ friends … to go as emissaries of the incarnate word, to be a gift and to speak and act for God’s dream. To go into the world of God’s dream.”Calling each and every one into action, the presiding bishop said: “God is sending you to a rebellious house, full of impudent and stubborn folks.  As the prophet Pogo said, ’is us.’Your job is to go and say, “listen up – here’s the deal, God’s got a better world in mind, and you are needed to help make it happen.”  And once you’ve started the conversation about good news, keep moving, keep showing and telling the world what God’s dream looks like.“Eventually, the world will know they’ve met a prophet – a whole community of prophets.”God is sending you to a rebellious house; full of impudent and stubborn folk (…) some is us. Your job is to go and say “listen up, here is the deal: God has a better world in mind and you are needed to help make it happen; and once you’ve started the conversation about good news, keep moving, keep showing and telling the world what God’s dream looks like, and eventually the world will know… they’ve met a prophet, a full community of prophets.”UTO representatives from each province and diocese – many of them dressed in bright UTO blue –approached the altar and presented slips of paper with the dollar amount they raised over the past triennium for the United Thank Offering, a grant-making agency that supports work that alleviates human suffering. UTO grants are funded in large part with the money that Episcopalians deposit as thanksgiving offerings in small cardboard “blue boxes,” which many keep in their homes and offices.Diocese of Haiti Bishop Zache Duracin and Bishop Suffragan Ogé Beauvoir concelebrated the Eucharist with Jefferts Schori. The Rev. Drew Klatte of Indianapolis and the Rev. Pamela Nesbit of Pennsylvania were the deacons.— Cesar Cardoza is a member of the Episcopal News Service team at General Convention.The following sermon was presented today at the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church, meeting in Indianapolis IN through July 12.UTO INGATHERING AND FESTIVAL EUCHARISTSunday, July 8The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchDid you hear Ezekiel?  Mortals!  Stand up and listen!  God is sending you to a rebellious house, full of impudent and stubborn folks.  Your job is to go tell them, “listen up – here’s the deal, from the Big Man himself.”  And if they don’t listen, at least they will have met a prophet.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori preaches at the United Thank Offering Ingathering and Festival Eucharist on July 8 during the Episcopal Church’s General Convention. Photo/Lynette WilsonGarrison Keillor is famous for noting that nobody wants a prophet at a birthday party.  Our image of prophets is something like fire-breathing dragons or maybe Nunzilla, but a prophet is simply somebody sent to speak for God, to tell it like it really is.  Sometimes prophets speak words of comfort and strength, the kind of words the psalmist is asking for – mercy and relief.  And sometimes the prophet speaks words that are harder to hear, reminding us that we’re supposed to love God with all we are and have and love our neighbors as ourselves.  The reminder usually comes because the audience hasn’t been living up to that expectation.  Whatever Jesus said in the synagogue seems to have been that kind of challenging word.Jesus’ friends and neighbors obviously don’t expect to hear anything prophetic from the ordinary carpenter down the street or from the brother of their friends.  He has never stood up in their synagogue before and said anything particularly challenging – so who does he think he is?  Mark doesn’t tell us what he reads or says.  Luke says that it’s the part of Isaiah that says, “the Spirit has anointed me to bring good news to the poor, release to the captives, healing to the blind, justice to the oppressed, and to announce the year of the Lord’s favor.”  And his friends and neighbors are offended.It is offensive – and confronting and challenging – to hear that even though you think you’re getting along OK, you’ve missed the boat.  Yet until we can see the chasm between what is and what ought to be, we don’t have any hope of changing.  Indeed it is the act of crossing that boundary between what is and what ought to be that is so characteristic of prophets.  When Jesus is called a prophet, it has to do with erasing the boundary between God and human flesh.  Prophetic words of comfort or challenge urge a kind of frontier work – getting across the fence between fear and possibility, reconciling division, transforming injustice, urging the lost onto the road home.Sometimes those encouragers of boundary crossing come in very ordinary, even quiet, packages – and that may be what the people in Jesus’ hometown were so annoyed about.  It’s harder to ignore somebody you respect or know pretty well.A prophetic invitation arrived in my inbox a couple of months ago.  A group of Christian leaders and politicians was asked to come to Washington, DC, to consider the state of public discourse in the United States.  The invitation made reference to one of our better known political figures, Senator Jack Danforth.[1]  A conversation about civility seemed a highly appropriate endeavor, but as the day grew closer, getting ready for this gathering seemed a lot more urgent, and I came very close to canceling.  But those who went heard a prophetic chorus of voices – Roman Catholic clergy and religious, Southern Baptist preachers, Senators and Representatives from both parties, Lutheran and Methodist bishops, evangelical pastors from the Assembly of God and Pentecostal traditions.  Each one lamented the loss of respect for political opponents and the inability to make common cause for the greater good.  We didn’t read today’s psalm, but it certainly fit the conversation:Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy, we’ve had more than enough contempt.Please!  No more ridicule from the arrogant, or abuse from proud and conceited people!We started our gathering by talking about the hope of Americans and indeed people across the world for change, in the face of the contempt and arrogance they hear from Congress and other politicians.  We soon moved to talking about the abuse and ridicule we hear from our brothers and sisters in Christ.  That sort of confession brought hope, and urged us into other kinds of frontier crossing, beginning with finding a prayer partner.  Mine is the Rev. Franklyn Richardson, pastor of Grace Baptist Church in Mt. Vernon, New York and Port St Lucie, Florida.  Other kinds of prophetic action and word are going to emerge from this process, including a statement and a number of positive actions to encourage more civil and effective discourse in politics and in our religious lives.  Words matter profoundly, and as Christians we affirm that every time we gather to give thanks for the frontier crossing incarnate Word in our midst.Prophets speak and act for God, with spoken and incarnate words of strength, hope, and challenge.  That ministry comes in many forms.  Today we’re going to give thanks for the prophetic work of the United Thank Offering, reaching out in creative possibility around the globe.  Each triennial gathering of the Episcopal Church Women begins with a blessing and distribution of crosses, and the hands that are extended to receive them are a sacrament of blessing for this kind of prophetic work.  When Jesus lays on hands and heals a few, even in a place that doesn’t think he’s got much to offer, he’s doing something prophetic.  The work those hands of ECW members do in gathering and blessing ministries around the globe is another way of reaching out across borders, boundaries, walls and fences of division.What about your hands?  They, too, are instruments of healing, reconciling, re-creation – let’s see those hands!  Here is a sacrament of God’s mission.  How will you use those hands in an impudent and rebellious house?  These hands can be instruments of warning, or to comfort and strengthen the wavering.  Hands can be instruments of prophetic communication, a gift only some among us have learned.When Jesus goes off to other villages to teach, he is using words and hands in prophetic ways, announcing the reign of God close at hand, healing, feeding, and drawing people into community.  He sends his friends out to do the same things:to announce the good news of the reign of Godto teach new believersto heal the hurtingto challenge injusticeand to tend the garden we share with all the rest of creation.Those five marks of mission are the work and mark of prophets, of all Jesus’ friends and their partners.  All of his commentary about what to take on the trip across the border is a reminder to keep it simple – to go as emissaries of the incarnate word, to be a gift and to speak and act for God’s dream – to GO into the world of God’s dream.When we gather like this to make Eucharist, we offer all that we are and have for this work.  That little exchange that starts, “lift up your hearts,” is about entering another reality – some old translators put it, “hearts aloft!”  Get moving!  Go cross the frontier between heaven and earth – boldly go where Jesus has gone before – and invite others to go with you to help build the world that God intended at creation.So – mortals, prophets – stand up!  God is sending you to a rebellious house, full of impudent and stubborn folks.  As the prophet Pogo said, “is us.”[2]  Your job is to go and say, “listen up – here’s the deal, God’s got a better world in mind, and you are needed to help make it happen.”  And once you’ve started the conversation about good news, keep moving, keep showing and telling the world what God’s dream looks like.Eventually, the world will know they’ve met a prophet – a whole community of prophets.[1] An Episcopal priest as well, he’s been a prophetic force in the search for peace in Sudan.[2] “We have met the enemy, and he is us.” Walt Kelly, cf. The Pogo Papers, 1953. http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Walt_Kelly Act for God’s dream, Presiding Bishop tells convention Eucharist Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH July 9, 2012 at 9:12 am Thank you for a challenging message. We are all prophets and healers. It is our responsibility to use those gifts given to us and not just hold on to them and do nothing. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books General Convention 2012, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Billie Putnam. says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Sylvia Robinson Corrigan says: Featured Events July 8, 2012 at 9:57 pm As a former ECW president and United Thank Offering Coordinator for the Diocese of Connecticut, I want to thank our Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori for her words of encouragement regarding the prophetic work of the UTO, a long standing mission of this church. I am also grateful to hear her call for civility – at the very least -and effective discourse in political and religious life. The exercise of mutual respect was taught in the both the Old and New Testaments and further, we indeed are invited to proclaim the hope we know and not to crush it. Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Submit a Press Release General Convention, Comments are closed. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 8, 2012 at 9:41 pm The PB has turned today’s Gospel on herself and her vassals.“Impudent and rebellious” are the precise words for the TEC that chooses to blesswrong behavior and says that there is more than one way to God.The Devil is alive and well in the hierarchy of this church which was my great love. I can only pray for you all as you choose to take the easy way. Politically correct has over-ruled God’s Word–for now. It is still HIS world and He will win. An Anglican of a different color. Billie Putnam Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments (4) Rector Knoxville, TN Jeffrey Knox says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By Cesar CardozaPosted Jul 8, 2012 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET July 9, 2012 at 9:50 am “Home is where the heart is…”. We are not at Home until we put our trust in Him. He trust us to do this with one another… Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Karen White says: last_img read more