Australian Teams In Camp This Weekend

first_imgWhile most of us are winding down from a busy 2012 and getting into the festive season, our Australian teams are still busy training in the lead up to the Super Trans Tasman in early February. This weekend will see the Australian Men’s and Mixed Open teams travel to Parkes, New South Wales as they prepare to defend their Trans Tasman titles they claimed in April this year. The Parkes Touch Association has once a year hosted the Men’s Open team in recent times and is excited to this year accommodate the inclusion of the Mixed team to the area as well. The camp will also include clinics with Parkes junior Touch Football representatives as has been done in previous years. The Women’s Open team will be holding their training camp in Brisbane on Saturday and the Sunshine Coast on Sunday as they aim to continue their dominance over New Zealand. Stay tuned to the website next week to read training camp diaries from a representative of each the Australian Open teams. Related LinksAussie Teams In Camplast_img read more

10 months agoWolves confident deal for Chelsea striker Abraham will get all-clear

first_imgWolves confident deal for Chelsea striker Abraham will get all-clearby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves are confident their deal for Chelsea striker Tammy Abraham is on.The Mirror says Wolves have made the England striker a prime January target and are keen on taking the 21-year-old from Stamford Bridge in a potential £18million deal.Abraham has starred for Aston Villa on loan in the Championship this season, scoring 16 goals in 20 games.Wolves officials have been working to ascertain whether Abraham would be eligible to play for the club this season, having already featured for both Villa and Chelsea. He also featured in a Premier League 2 match against Derby County, leading to questions over his eligibility.But Wolves can cite precedent, such as Liam Walsh, who played for Birmingham City, Bristol City and Everton’s U-23 side last season, but whose switch to the Robins was allowed by the FA – without help from FIFA. TagsTransfersLoan MarketAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoRangers boss Gerrard: I don’t bother with Heskey interviews

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Rangers boss Gerrard: I don’t bother with Heskey interviewsby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveRangers boss Steven Gerrard is unhappy with former Liverpool teammate Emile Heskey after comments on his managerial credentials.Heskey suggested this week that it was easier for Gerrard and fellow managers to land a top job because of his skin colour.Ahead of his side’s Europa League clash with Feyenoord, Gerrard delivered a withering response to his former teammate.“I don’t have anything to say on that. I don’t really look out for any interviews that Emile Heskey does,” the Rangers boss said.Gerrard and Heskey played together for club and country and were part of the Liverpool side that won the treble in 2001. last_img read more

More than 20,000 Employed Under JEEP

first_imgApproximately 20, 624 individuals have gained employment under the Jamaica Emergency Employment Programme (JEEP), which is now in its second phase. The project, which was launched in March this year, is one of the strategies of the  Government to respond to the chronic unemployment status of some Jamaicans, particularly those in the lower socio-economic strata, persons with special needs as well as those with low skill levels. Providing information on the initiative at a recent press conference, Minister of Transport, Works and Housing, Dr. the Hon. Omar Davies, said data shows that JEEP has had a meaningful impact on the unemployment level in Jamaica. “The data are very impressive…the data from STATIN (Statistical Institute of Jamaica) in terms of the impact of JEEP, (shows that) there was a reduction in the level of unemployment between the data from April and July, a reduction from 14.3 per cent to 12.8 per cent and the impact of JEEP is significant in terms of the number of jobs created, something in the order of over 20, 000,” he said. The projects have been implemented through several government ministries, in what can be described as a successful example of a joined-up government approach. Employment has been created in the areas of infrastructure, agriculture, education and intensive labour, among others. The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries has implemented several projects in turmeric cultivation, ginger industry resuscitation, school feeding and expansion of Rural Agricultural Development Agency (RADA) Twickenham industry.  To date, over 3,200 persons have benefitted through these projects. The Ministry of Labour and Social Security has been partnering with private sector entities for the attachment of 450 unemployed young adults over a two-year period. Some 405 persons have so far been employed under this initiative, with 379 currently being paid by the private sector employers. Approximately 40 per cent of these trainees have received permanent employment, as a result of the JEEP initiative. In addition, some 624 persons have received employment through the Ministry of Education in partnership with the Heart Trust/NTA. The slate of JEEP projects under the Ministry includes data management, Career Advancement Programme (CAP) and teacher’s assistant programme. The National Works Agency (NWA) has also undertaken a labour intensive programme involving primarily road support infrastructure rehabilitation and maintenance. Through the NWA, a total of 15,145 individuals have received work. “There are several projects, which have been supervised by the NWA because we have reallocated funds from JDIP (Jamaica Development Infrastructure Programme) but the big difference is that Members of Parliament, councillors, community groups have had a say in the development of these capital projects,” Dr. Davies said. The Ministry of Tourism and Entertainment through the Tourism Enhancement Fund (TEF), has also undertaken various projects through the parish councils, Tourism Product Development Company (TPDCo), National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA), Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT) and the Hope Zoo Foundation, with some 1,074 persons employed to date. Approximately 128 persons have received employment through the Ministry of Transport, Works and Housing. Dr. Davies said Phase II is expected to be completed during financial year 2013/14 and the Government is in the process of seeking funds to continue the work of JEEP. “I expect to have confirmed success in identifying funds early in the New Year, such that it can be built into the budget for 2013/14,” he stated. Some $6 billion has been earmarked to be spent on projects under the JEEP. An estimated 35,000 persons are expected to be employed during Phase II. During Phase I, roughly 15,000 persons were employed in several ministries and agencies.         Members of Parliament, other political representatives, government agencies, citizens associations, church groups and non-governmental organizations are able to make submissions to the JEEP Secretariat for projects to be executed under the initiative. Interested individuals may contact the Secretariat at­­­ 754-2584 – 9 or visit jeep@mtw.gov.jmlast_img read more

Radon tests to be required for Yukon day homes child care centres

first_imgWHITEHORSE – The Yukon government will make radon testing a licensing requirement for new and existing child care centres and day homes in the territory.If the tests are positive, those same facilities must also act to reduce radon gas concentrations, the government announced Wednesday.“I’m really proud to say that Yukon is leading the way on this,” Health and Social Services Minister Pauline Frost said in an interview.Currently, no other Canadian jurisdiction mandates radon testing to obtain a day care or day home licence, the minister said.The territory has alerted all licensed child care centres and day homes to make them aware of the impending requirement, Frost said.A timeline for the changes has yet to be established, but it will occur in phases.Radon is a naturally-occurring, colourless, odourless, radioactive gas that is created through the breakdown of uranium in soil and rock.If the gas seeps into a structure and accumulates in high levels, radon inhalation can result in lung damage and an elevated risk of cancer, said a bulletin on the Health Canada website.“The health and safety of all Yukon children is the top priority for this government. So this new requirement will ensure that all children in licensed day care centres and day homes throughout the Yukon will be protected,” Frost said.Yukon NDP Leader Liz Hanson asked the government last week if it had decided to add mandatory radon testing to a 72-point assessment checklist that covers everything from ensuring the water supply meets Canadian standards “to placement of thumbtacks,” which the centres must comply with to get a licence to operate.In a 2017 capital asset management report, the Auditor General of Canada noted that the Department of Health and Social Services has known about “unacceptable levels of radon in some of Yukon’s licensed day cares and day homes,” since 2008, Hanson told the legislature.Erik Simanis, the owner-operator of Radon Measurement and Mitigation Yukon, said radon levels vary across the territory.“There’s potential for it to be everywhere. I’ve done lots of work in Whitehorse and in the communities as well,” he said.“There are certainly some spots that are worse and some that are better.”Testing for radon in a two-storey, six- to eight-bedroom building would cost a few hundred dollars, he said.The price of radon remediation can range between $1,500 and $5,000 depending on a building’s size and construction.Foundations, crawl spaces and unfinished rooms are common areas to test for high concentrations of radon presence in a building, he explained.Last winter and spring, the Yukon government tested care facilities, group homes, and young offender facilities that Health and Social Services is responsible for, Frost said.She could not confirm whether a particular facility was found to contain high levels of radon.(Whitehorse Star)last_img read more

LTTE flag waved at match

Following the incident a tight security presence was seen near the stands where the Sri Lankan supporters were sitting. The Australian police seized an LTTE flag which was waved at the match between Australia and Sri Lanka in Sydney a short while ago.A man who was seen waving the flag during the Sri Lankan innings was also taken away by the police.

Dublins AllIreland three inarow dream lives on after seeing off archrivals Cork

first_img Short URL 14,456 Views Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Dublin’s All-Ireland three in-a-row dream lives on after seeing off arch-rivals Cork Mick Bohan’s Sky Blues now face Galway in the All-Ireland final. Dublin 2-11Cork 0-11 Sinead Goldrick with Eimear Scally and Saoirse Noonan. Source: Morgan Treacy/INPHOAND SO, THE three in-a-row dream lives on for reigning All-Ireland champions Dublin.It was another ding-dong battle against arch-rivals Cork in front of 10,886 at Croke Park in the historic semi-final, but goals win games and substitute Caoimhe O’Connor and captain Sinéad Aherne did just that for Mick Bohan’s Sky Blues.Dublin’s bench was key as Aherne’s 1-3 and Siobhan McGrath’s Player of the Match shift around the middle all helped the holders over the line, while Cork only had three scorers.Ephie Fitzgerald’s side must go back to the well now — despite beating their old foes twice in the league — after finishing second best in last years’ final. And it’s Galway up next for Dublin, after the Tribe beat Mayo earlier.In a first half which saw the sides level seven times after Carla Rowe’s early point, Dublin suffered a hammer blow with four minutes on the clock as Nicole Owen’s afternoon ended early. The St Sylvester’s star, who started in a late change, had her right knee heavily strapped from the get-go and it buckled as she tracked Orla Finn. She was aided off the field, and Finn went on to kick the Rebel’s opening point with seven minutes on the clock.The Kinsale sharpshooter would add a further four frees to lead the Cork charge in the opening period, but neither side could go more than one point ahead.2018 Player of the Year Sinéad Aherne notched two Dublin frees, while Owens’ replacement Whyte, Lyndsey Davey and Niamh McEvoy fired the Sky Blues’ other scores. Nicole Owens is helped off the field. Source: Morgan Treacy/INPHOAt the other end, captain Doireann O’Sullivan and Eimear Scally split the posts.0-7 a-piece at the break, Aherne drew first blood in the second period through a free, before Finn levelled proceedings once again at the other end with her own. Niamh Collins, who had been brilliantly leading the Dublin defence before that, saw yellow for the preceding foul.Rowe’s third score of the afternoon came from a quick one-two free, which put 14-woman Dublin in the driving seat once again at 0-9 to 0-8.2017 Player of the Year Noelle Healy, who plays her club football with Mourneabbey on Leeside, added another as she fisted the ball into the Hill end after good fielding from Aherne in the build-up.Cork soon went down to 14 themselves, losing Eimear Meaney to the sin-bin, and then had an invaluable goal chance pull wide. Ciara O’Sullivan found substitute Aine O’Sullivan, but the latter’s effort went across the goal face and just wide.And then, came Dublin’s opportunity in the 44th minute.Caoimhe O’Connor, who came from the bench five minutes beforehand, finished off an excellent team move to make it 1-10 to 0-9.Bohan’s bench power continued from there, with Jennifer Dunne tagging on another fisted point, while Ciara O’Sullivan was sin-binned for a clash with Lyndsey Davey in the build-up to that score. A Finn free concluded Cork’s 17-minute drought but Dublin looked to have enough to see this one out as the clock ran down.To their credit, Cork battled to the death but the Dublin defence — led by Sinead Goldrick — dealt with all thrown their way. Cork’s Eimear Scally with Eabha Rutledge of Dublin. Source: Morgan Treacy/INPHOWith 70 seconds left, Collins fired home to make it 2-11 to 0-10. But referee Maggie Farrelly brought it back for a foul in the build-up, awarding Dublin a penalty instead.Aherne stepped up and slotted home accordingly to put the gloss on the win, and a Finn free at the other end was nothing but a consolation as it finished 2-11 to 0-11.Scorers for Dublin: Carla Rowe (0-3), Oonagh Whyte (0-1), Sinead Aherne (1-3, 3f), Lyndsey Davey (0-1), Niamh McEvoy (0-1), Noelle Healy (0-1) Caoimhe O’Connor (1-0), Jennifer Dunne (0-1)Scorers for Cork: Orla Finn (0-9, 8f), Doireann O’Sullivan (0-1), Eimear Scally (0-1)Dublin1. Ciara Trant (St Brigids)2. Éabha Rutledge (Kilmacud Crokes)3. Niamh Collins (Foxrock Cabinteely)4. Martha Byrne (Cuala)5. Aoife Kane (Kilmacud Crokes)6. Sinéad Goldrick (Foxrock Cabinteely)7. Olwen Carey (Thomas Davis)8. Lauren Magee (Kilmacud Crokes)9. Siobhán McGrath (Thomas Davis)10. Carla Rowe (Clann Mhuire)11. Niamh McEvoy (St Sylvesters)12. Lyndsey Davey (Skerries Harps) Aug 25th 2019, 5:39 PM https://the42.ie/4781460 Reports from Croke Parkcenter_img By Emma Duffy Share5 Tweet Email Sunday 25 Aug 2019, 5:39 PM Emma Duffy 13. Sinéad Aherne (St Sylvesters)23. Niamh Hetherton (Clontarf)29. Nicole Owens (St Sylvesters)Subs22. Oonagh Whyte for Nicole Owens (4)14. Noelle Healy for Niamh Hetherton (HT)19. Caoimhe O’Connor for Oonagh Whyte (39)15. Jennifer Dunne for Aoife Kane (49)20. Kate Sullivan for Niamh McEvoy (59)Cork1. Martina O’Brien (Clonakilty)2. Hannah Looney (Aghada)3. Eimear Meaney (Mourneabbey)4. Shauna Kelly (Araglen Desmonds Bui)5. Aishling Hutchings (Fermoy)6. Melissa Duggan (Dohenys)7. Eimear Kiely (Valley Rovers)8. Niamh Cotter (Beara)9. Maire O’Callaghan (Mourneabbey)10. Orlagh Farmer (Midleton)11. Ciara O’Sullivan (Mourneabbey)17. Doireann O’Sullivan (Mourneabbey)19. Saoirse Noonan (Nemo Rangers)14. Eimear Scally (Éire Óg)15. Orla Finn (Kinsale)Subs12. Aine O’Sullivan for Niamh Cotter (29)23. Emma Spillane for Shauna Kelly (45)13. Libby Coppinger for Saoirse Noonan (46)18. Rhona Ní Bhuachalla for Doireann O’Sullivan (49)25. Daire Kiely for Eimear Kiely (49)Referee: Maggie Farrelly (Cavan). 3 Comments last_img read more

Cleaning lady in Greece gets 10 years in jail for faking elementary

first_imgA 53-year-old woman has been sentenced to 10 years in jail in Greece for lying about her elementary school record, in order to get a job as a cleaner.The extremely harsh court ruling based on charges of defrauding the public, has caused major uproar in the country, Athens News Agency reports.“This decision is not simply inhuman. It is another very indicative sign of permanent pathogens in the criminal justice system,” the Hellenic League for Human Rights said in a statement.According to the indictment, the woman – who has not been named – altered the certificate to show she had completed six years of elementary school instead of five, a prerequisite to get hired as a cleaner and be able to support her family, as she stated.Until even three decades ago many Greek children would drop out of school early, particularly in rural areas due to poverty. When compared to much lower sentences handed to more serious crimes by Greek courts, this sentence seems unreasonable.She had since worked at a publicly-funded nursery for 15 years until a review in 2014 which revealed the certificate’s data were not all correct.A senior prosecutor for the Supreme Court will review the legal reasoning of the regional court next week, judicial sources said. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Three successful women inspire us at HACCIs Women in Leadership event

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram It has been two years since the launch of the inaugural ‘Women in leadership’ event in 2017, and since then HACCI Victoria has not stopped exploring the conscious and unconscious bias that female leaders experience in their workplace, their challenges, their triumphs and their vision. The latest ‘Women in Leadership’ event on 14 May casts the spotlight on three outstanding female leaders of the Greek Australian community: Barbara Konstas, Vicky Papachristos and Alice Sidhu.All three will explore their individual road to success in highly stressful and competitive environments.Barbara Konstas is the CEO of the Melbourne Seafood Centre, Director of Victorian WISA (Women in Seafood Australasia), Deputy Chair of Seafood Industry Victoria and Director of the SETFIA (South East Trawl Fishing Association). Securing and protecting resources in Australia and particular Victoria, understanding and promoting sustainable practices in the seafood industry so that the sector continues to develop and survive for future generations, are some of Barbara’s every day challenges. She is passionate that through this role she can provide mentoring and leadership to women who work within the seafood community.Vicky Papachristos is the director at GMHBA Health Insurance. As an experienced non-executive company director, she currently sits on three boards. These are the GMHBA Private Health Insurance, myOwn Health – a JV with AIA Group and Big River Industries – an ASX listed micro-cap company. As an executive and a consultant, she has spent over 30 years in blue chip companies. These include Shell, Westpac, Myer and the Olympics. Her capabilities and focus have always been on business strategy and customer engagement and runs her own consultancy.Alice Sidhu is a business transformation expert, digital authority, and Advisory Board member, working with organisations to improve their operations, drive their innovation agenda, and find new ways to grow. Her diverse industry experience includes retail, telecommunications, IT, mining and public sector. Having held senior global roles in many multi-national organisations as well as leading complex initiatives across the Asia Pacific, has given Alice a unique insight into how organisational ecosystems operate and how they need to evolve for what’s coming. Alice is CEO of BY THE WAY GROUP, the digital publishing company behind the Leadership of Fools podcast series and one of the Founders of RGT, advising organisations on digital transformation.READ MORE: HACCI acknowledges successful Hellenes for their contributionThe event takes place from 6-8pm on 14 May at International Chamber House (5/121 Exhibition Street Melbourne) and is free to members and $25 to non members. More info on 03 9602 2977 or at info@hacci.com.au.last_img read more

WikiLeaksorg nest plus accessible

first_imgWikiLeaks.org n’est plus accessibleSelon WireUpdate, le site aux méthodes controversées WikLeaks.org ne fonctionne plus depuis la nuit dernière. Son service de DNS (qui gère les noms de domaine), EveryDNS.net, l’aurait rendu inaccessible.Depuis cette nuit, impossible de consulter le site web fondé par Julian Assange, qui a publié cette année sur Internet de nombreux télégrammes diplomatiques, embarrassant plusieurs gouvernements dont celui des Etats-Unis.EveryDNS.net, qui fournissait son nom de domaine à WikiLeaks, a cessé de lui proposer ses services. Le site controversé est donc inaccessible pour cette raison ce matin. EveryDNS.net parle de plusieurs attaques DDOS, c’est-à-dire des attaques par déni de service, qui auraient eu pour but de rendre le site de Julian Assange indisponible. Le fournisseur de noms de domaine craignait alors pour la stabilité de son infrastructure, qui garantit l’accès à plus de 500.000 autres sites web.Sur Twitter, le site a dénoncé des cyberattaques, récemment, dirigées contre ses serveurs. Ceux qui acceptent d’aider WikiLeaks sont la cible de pressions de la part des gouvernements concernés par les révélations embarrassantes.À lire aussiSmartphone, baleine et Pornhub, les 8 actus sciences que vous devez connaître ce 2 maiPar ailleurs, le site spécialisé dans les fuites d’informations, laché cette semaine par son hébergeur Amazon sous la pression des autorités américaines (voir notre article), ferait désormais appel à OVH, un hébergeur basé à Roubaix, dans le Nord, bien que WikiLeaks soit toujours inaccessible pour le moment. Selon LePoint.fr, OVH avait déjà fait preuve par le passé d’un engagement fort pour la liberté d’expression.Aux Etats-Unis, WikiLeaks est considéré comme un traître qui met en danger la vie des soldats sur le terrain en rendant accessible à tous des informations diplomatiques ultra-confidentielles.Le 3 décembre 2010 à 09:44 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

Une application Office gratuite pour iPad

first_imgUne application Office gratuite pour iPadLes possesseurs d’iPad pourront très prochainement, et gratuitement, bénéficier de la suite bureautique Office. OnLive Desktop s’apprête en effet à livrer une application qui permettra d’accéder à un environnement Windows 7 à distance, en passant par le Cloud.L’éditeur OnLive Desktop a annoncé être sur le point de lancer une application iPad gratuite permettant d’utiliser Word, Excel et PowerPoint, la suite bureautique Office de Microsoft. Cette application, pour l’heure réservée au tablettes d’Apple, passe par le Cloud pour accéder aux versions des logiciels qu’il héberge.À lire aussiL’Assurance Maladie lance son application Ameli sur Google Play et App Store.L’utilisateur, qui pour se connecter à l’appli devra disposer d’un compte Online, se verra offrir un espace de 2 Go en ligne où il pourra stocker ses fichiers. Il pourra alors consulter et éditer des documents Word, Excel et PowerPoint avec son iPad. Chroniqueur du Wall Street Journal, Walt Mossberg a testé cette appli et affirme qu’elle fonctionne de la même façon qu’une version classique d’Office. Il prévient toutefois qu’une connexion très performante, d’au moins 1,5 Mo, est nécessaire pour profiter pleinement de toutes les fonctionnalités de la suite. L’appli OnLive Desktop est en outre inaccessible hors connexion. Walt Mossberg précise enfin le risque d’attente est important, en cas d’affluence sur les serveurs.Mais obtenir un accès prioritaire sera possible, avec la version payante de l’application. Pour 10 dollars par mois (8 euros environ), cette version Pro offrira aussi 50 Go d’espace de stockage, la possibilité d’installer des programmes additionnels ainsi qu’un mode collaboratif.Disponible dans les semaines à venir, OnLive Desktop sera rapidement décliné sur iPhone, Android et sur Mac comme sur PC.Le 15 janvier 2012 à 16:30 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

The Exorcist Brings a Strong Season to an Emotional End

first_img I guess there’s really no other way this season of The Exorcist could have gone, huh? Even a few hours removed from the second season finale, I’m still processing it. Over its second season, The Exorcist became one of my favorite shows. It’s first had some problems, and you could see them addressing each one in the second. There were no close-ups of bad CGI birds, no cutting away from the action to focus on something completely unrelated. This season used the time it had to make us care about each one of the characters, which only made it scarier when things started going bad.That does mean there wasn’t as much time to focus on on the larger demon conspiracy plot. Some episodes had more of it than others, but that story didn’t really go anywhere this season. It was very much a secondary plot. In that way, Andy’s story might have been too good this season. Once an episode started to focus on Andy and the kids, we really didn’t want to hear about anything else. Especially once things started getting scary. Cutting away to an unrelated demon conspiracy would have killed the tension those island scenes worked so hard to build. So while the larger overarching plot may not have moved forward all that much this season, it’s OK. It just means they came up with a great 10-episode arc that was even better. The downside is that the opening scene of the finale isn’t quite as effective as they wanted it to be. The episode opens on Bennett in the hospital. In his weakened state, someone puts a demonic urn under his bed. This sets up something later in the episode. It’s supposed to sit in the back of your mind, letting a sense of dread grow, making you wonder when the show will return to it. It doesn’t really do that. Again, once we get back to the island, you really don’t care about anything else. It still pays off though. Maybe not as much as it could have, but there is still a great scare at the end.Ben Daniels, Zuleikha Robinson and Alfonso Herrera (Cr: Sergei Bachlakov/FOX)On the island, we pick right back up with Marcus as he drags Andy through the woods. Tomas meets back up with him, revealing that Mouse has come along too. Marcus recognizes Mouse instantly, and this episode does some great character work between the two of them. The fact that she’s become an exorcist fills Marcus with regret, and he’s horrified when she suggests killing Andy to destroy the demon. What follows is an emotional and well-acted philosophical debate. That’s really hard for a TV show to pull off, but The Exorcist accomplishes it by keeping the argument short and the stakes high. With Rose and the kids off the island, the police aren’t far away. They don’t have time to complete the exorcism, and the real Andy is holding the demon inside him, preventing it from escaping and hurting anyone else. Tomas, to Marcus’s protest, goes inside Andy’s mind to offer himself to the demon as bait.The scene inside Andy’s mind is some great haunted house horror. It’s the same set as Andy’s house, but something’s clearly wrong. Creepy paintings line the walls and shadowy figures walk the halls. Andy’s inside and he’s able to defeat the creature with the bat, but every time he does, he says, it comes back stronger. Then he gets pulled through a door and Marcus is alone with Demon Nikki. This is the scene that gives you everything you expect to see from an Exorcist series. The demon twists its body into unnatural shapes and crab walks through the hall. It legitimately made me jump when the thing charged at the screen. Tomas runs into the creepy art room, where a cut-open, weakened Andy sits. Tomas offers to save him by accepting the demon into his body. Andy says that was never part of the deal. Before Tomas can convince him, the paintings in the room start melting. The demon is there, looking as horrifying as ever. Tomas offers himself up to the demon, who comes so close to integrating with the priest. We even see the second eye appear on real-world Tomas.John Cho (Cr: Sergei Bachlakov/FOX)That’s when the episode delivers its big shock. After season one, when Marcus and Tomas exorcised an integrated demon from Angela Rance, we figured they could do anything. Sure, this demon was old and powerful, but we were sure the exorcism had to work eventually somehow. But they don’t save Andy. As soon as the demon releases its hold on him to possess Tomas, Andy begs Marcus to kill him. After a whole episode of arguing that exorcists shouldn’t be executioners, Marcus proves Mouse’s point. He kills Andy and the demon dies with him. The second eye drains from Tomas’s. I guess there was no way this season was going to end happily for Andy. He’d killed and hurt too many people. He wasn’t going to finish this season out on an idyllic porch somewhere with his family. That didn’t stop his death from being any less of a surprise. Marcus and Tomas have always found other ways to defeat a demon, but sometimes there is no other way.After 40 minutes of terror, the episode spent the rest of its time letting the audience come down.  Well, most of it anyway. Rose gives the police a story about how Andy killed Harper’s mom in self-defense, but snapped and went on an unhinged violent rampage after that. She’s commended for taking care of the kids through all of it. Tomas delivers a message for Rose and each of the kids that Andy gave him before he died. Each one is personal and encouraging and lovely. I almost, almost, teared up. That comes later. This season did a fantastic job of making us care about each one of these kids. For most of the season, it amped up the horror significantly. In the finale, it made for the most cathartic, heartwarming ending. They spend most of the episode worrying that they’ll be split apart. Rose goes to pick up Truck from the psychiatric facility and says she’s found a home for him. It turns out to be her home, and what’s more than that, she’s taken in all of Andy’s kids. She’s keeping the family together. It was at this moment that someone started cutting onions in my living room. Damn Exorcist, this is not the emotion I expect to get from you.Brianna Hildebrand, Guest star Beatrice Kitsos, guest star Cyrus Arnold, guest star Hunter Dillon, guest star Alex Barima and Li Jun Li (Cr: Sergei Bachlakov/FOX)Even with the happy ending, remember this is still a horror movie. And like any good horror movie it can’t end without giving you one final scare. Remember the opening scene with Bennett? Even though it was mostly forgotten until now, it’s still used to great effect when it gets brought back up. As he opens his eyes on the hospital bed, we see that a demon has fully taken him over. Next, we see a long, slow, silent shot of a nurse walking down the hall, checking every room. The whole time you know something’s going to happen, just not when. Just when the terror can’t be built any higher, we see Bennett emerge with a giant pair of scissors. It’s a brilliant recreation of Exorcist III‘s most famous jumpscare. Just like that classic scene, it cuts away to a headless statue. The decapitation is left to our imagination, where it’s more horrific than anything the TV show could have shown us.There are clearly plans for season three, whether the show gets one or not. Where Andy’s family got to stay together after his death, Marcus and Tomas don’t. Marcus is dealing with the guilt of killing Andy and decides he has to go his own way for a while. It’s sad to see the pair split up like this and it’s made even sadder when Mouse finds Tomas pacing around his hotel room, sure that Marcus will come back. She tells him she doesn’t think hi is this time, and the two new partners set off together. But don’t worry. Marcus will be reunited with Tomas sooner rather than later. The season ends with Marcus hearing the voice of God for the first time in years. We don’t know what God said to him, but we know it was a warning. About Tomas.  It’s a strong ending to a fantastic second season for The Exorcist. It’s also a promise that even if season two didn’t do much with the demon conspiracy arc, it will play a much larger role in season three. Assuming we get one. You listening Disney? You can’t leave horror fans hanging like this. Stay on target 7 Horror Movies You Forgot Were GreatThe 11 Scariest Religious Horror Movies last_img read more

Hyundai will make Rear Occupant Alert standard by 2022

first_img Review • 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe review: Stylish and sure-footed Tags Hyundai Auto Tech Future Cars The more advanced version of Rear Occupant Alert involves more than just a new “if” statement buried somewhere in the car’s code. In addition to the door-based technology, Hyundai also embeds an ultrasonic sensor into the car to detect movement in the second row. If movement is detected after the vehicle is shut off and locked, it will honk the car’s horn and send a notification to the driver’s phone through Hyundai’s Blue Link connected-car system — provided the car is equipped with Blue Link and its service is active. Automakers haven’t really adopted systems like these en masse, in part because it incurs a greater cost than simply checking for opened doors.Right now, the basic Rear Occupant Alert is standard on the 2020 Santa Fe and Palisade SUVs, with the ultrasonic version available as an option. The ultrasonic system is available on the 2019 Santa Fe, as well. Later this year, when the 2020 Sonata launches, it will have the simpler system standard, too. It’s unclear which Hyundai vehicles are slated to make this standard in the future, but we’ll definitely call it out as it happens.GM is one of the pioneers of this tech, having added Rear Seat Reminder to more than 20 models for the 2017 model year. Nissan followed by making Rear Door Alert (there are a lot of silly proprietary names for this tech) standard on multiple cars in 2018. The 2020 Subaru Ascent added a rear-seat reminder system as standard equipment, too. As of May of this year, a bill has been floating around the US Senate that would seek to mandate this technology to reduce hot-car deaths, but nothing has come of it yet. Preview • 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe: Trading ‘Sport’ for family friendly tech 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe places safety before sport More about 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous Comments Now playing: Watch this: Enlarge ImageIt’s a pretty straightforward warning, although digital instrument clusters get a cute little diagram of the second row with the alert. Hyundai Automakers have been standardizing a number of safety systems in their vehicles over the last several years. Most OEMs tend to focus on avoiding crashes with included tech like automatic emergency braking and pedestrian detection, but many are also worried about what could happen if a child or pet is inadvertently left in the back seat. Hyundai on Wednesday announced that it will voluntarily standardize its Rear Occupant Alert system on “most” of its new vehicles by 2022. There’s a second, even more capable version of this system that the company says will also see expanded inclusion in the future, as well. As it turns out, July 31 is National Heatstroke Prevention Day, so Hyundai picked a good day to make this announcement.The more basic version of Rear Occupant Alert detects if a rear door was opened or closed prior to starting the car, and if that’s the case, it will remind the driver through a message in the gauge cluster to check the rear seats for anything that shouldn’t be left behind. This is more or less the same system that other automakers use. 2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid: First hybrid minivan wins on fuel economy More From Roadshow Share your voice 5 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe: A no-brainer recommendation 57 Photos 6:09 2018 Mercedes-Benz E400 Coupe: Drives better than most, and smells better too Hyundai Subarulast_img read more

13 killed in two road accidents in West Bengal

first_imgMALDA/CANNING: A total of 13 people was killed and 11 others injured in two road accidents in as many districts of West Bengal on Thursday, police said. While seven persons died in South 24 Parganas district, six others fell victim to another accident in Malda. Five members of a family and two others returning from the Kolkata airport were killed when their MUV fell into a road-side pond in South 24 Parganas district, the police said. Also Read – Delhi court acquits former coal secretary H.C. Gupta Advertise With Us The accident occurred at around 6 am after the driver lost control of the vehicle during rain at Ucchekhali under Bishnupur police station area. All the seven persons, including three women, died on the spot due to drowning, police said. Six persons had gone from Dakkhin Gouripur village in Bishnupur area to the Kolkata airport to receive a man who was returning from Qatar where he used to work. Also Read – Trouble brews on Congress turf, meeting underway at Rahul Gandhi’s residence Advertise With Us The driver of the vehicle fled after the accident. The deceased have been identified as Akkas Ali, his wife Salina Bibi, son Altab, daughter Esmatara, brother Munnaf, and two other persons – Meeraj Sheikh and Fulijan Bibi. In the other accident in Malda district, six persons were killed and 11 others injured when a speeding lorry rammed into a stationary SUV carrying wedding guests, police said. Advertise With Us The accident occurred at Bakharpur under Kaliachak police station area when the SUV was waiting there by the side of National Highway-34 for other vehicles going to the same destination. The wedding guests were on their way from Kaliachak to Gajol in the same district to attend a marriage, Superintendent of Police Alok Rajoria said. The SUV fell into a roadside ditch after it was hit by the lorry at around 12.30 am and three of its 17 occupants were killed on the spot. Two others succumbed in the Malda Medical College and Hospital where all the victims were initially taken. Rajoria said six of them were later referred to a hospital in Kolkata and one died on the way. The other injured persons were under treatment at the Malda Medical College and Hospital. The driver fled with the lorry after the accident but he was later arrested from Gajol, the SP said.last_img read more

With A Leap Second 2016 Promises To Linger Just A Little Bit

first_img Share Charles Krupa/APYour obligatory shot of a clock — with this crucial reminder: The ineluctable march of time will dally just a little bit when it bids farewell to 2016.Here’s a timely reminder for all you would-be revelers out there: Be careful with your countdowns this New Year’s Eve. There will be a little extra time to bask in the glow of a retreating 2016 — or curse its name, as the case may be.Whatever your inclination may be, one thing is certain: Before the year is out, the world’s foremost authority on time will be adding one more second to the clock.In a bulletin released this summer, the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service, or IERS, said it would be necessary to introduce a “leap second” at the end of December. Timekeepers use this added second much as leap years are used — to bring the world’s atomic clocks in sync with the Earth’s own distinctive rhythm, which in this case is determined by its rotation.This leap second isn’t the first. Since 1971, the world has added leap seconds with some regularity — typically every two to three years — and the latest leap second was added only last year, in June.Why do these leap seconds keep cropping up? Peter Whibberley, a research scientist with the U.K.’s National Physical Laboratory, explains it this way:“Atomic clocks are more than a million times better at keeping time than the rotation of the Earth, which fluctuates unpredictably. Leap seconds are needed to prevent civil time drifting away from Earth time. Although the drift is small — taking around a thousand years to accumulate a one-hour difference — if not corrected, it would eventually result in clocks showing midday before sunrise.”Recent research appears to back up Whibberley’s assessment. According to a study published earlier this month in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A, Earth’s rotation has slowed about 1.8 milliseconds per day — which means the solar day itself has lengthened, little by little. The researchers based this assessment on records dating back to 760 B.C., long before the implementation of the precise atomic clocks.The Los Angeles Times broke down the findings: “If humanity had been measuring time with an atomic clock that started running back in 700 BC, today that clock would read 7 p.m. when the sun is directly overhead rather than noon.”Still, however useful they may seem, these little extras can occasionally cause some big frustrations, as NPR’s Geoff Brumfiel notes:“Leap seconds have crashed airline reservation systems. They’re believed to have briefly shut down Russia’s GPS satellite system, and there’s potential for even greater mischief as things like financial trading become ever more precise in their use of time.”And those issues have earned the humble leap second its fair share of critics, who argue that it is standing in the way of the precision promised by atomic clocks. These critics would prefer the steadiness that may come with unmooring the world’s measurement of time from its astronomical inspiration.The debate has persisted for years, leaving the leap second with an uncertain fate. The United Nations announced last year that it will be postponing its decision on whether to keep the leap second around, saying that “further studies are required on the impact and application of a future reference time-scale.”The organization is not expected to return to the decision until 2023.All this is to say: Whether you like it or not, the leap second will be sticking around a while longer — and so will 2016, even if only by a single second.Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

Hope Scott Named to 2019 List of Most Influential Women in Corporate

first_imgBy The Oakland PostExcelling as Blue Shield of California’s Vice Presi­dent, Chief Risk & Compli­ance Officer and having fun along the way, Hope Scott has recently been named as one of Savoy’s 2019 Most Influential Women in Corpo­rate America, a list of African American women achievers impacting corporate America with expertise in a range of industries.Savoy Magazine is a na­tional publication covering the power, substance and style of African American lifestyle. From entertainment to sports, business to politics, design to style, Savoy is a cultural catalyst for the Af­rican-American community that showcases and drives positive dialogue on and about Black culture. Savoy is published quarterly and dis­tributed via subscriptions and newsstands worldwide.Hope Scott (Photo by: postnewsgroup.com)Scott was one of dozens se­lected from an original field of 500 nominees. The selec­tion committee included the Savoy editorial board and community leaders with rep­resentatives from the academ­ic and business arenas. The committee reviewed informa­tion on executives in human resources, information, real estate, finance, investment banking, diversity, founda­tions, procurement, business development, marketing, sales, health care, manufac­turing and legal.“I put in the time and hard work to earn a seat at the table,” Scott said. “When it wasn’t offered or wasn’t available to me, I took my­self to another table where my experience, talent, and vision were not only welcomed, but celebrated.” This mindset has aided in helping her garnish 30 years of legal practice ex­perience in the fields of health care and privacy law.A highlight in Scott’s ca­reer is mentoring people and watching them succeed in their chosen fields. “I never do anything I don’t want to do, and I never stop having fun,” said Scott who encourages ev­eryone to enjoy life.Scott joined Blue Shield of California in 2012 as the company’s Chief Privacy Of­ficer & Privacy Counsel. To­day, she leads and oversees the operations of Blue Shield of California’s corporate in­tegrity & risk management organization. Under her leadership, Blue Shield of California has been named one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies six times.Scott’s impressive career in healthcare includes leading privacy compliance in 27 countries and 53 U.S. states and jurisdictions.Prior to joining Blue Shield, Scott was the Global Chief Privacy Officer and Senior Privacy Counsel for Cigna.  She was also the principal of her own private law practice, focusing on providing legal and compliance counsel to health care providers and consumers, and she was senior counsel for Independence Blue Cross for 11 years.Scott earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from Bryn Mawr College and her Juris Doctor from Boston University School of Law.This article originally appeared in the Oakland Post.last_img read more

Using Artificial Intelligence in Sales Saves Time and Reveals New Opportunities

first_imgOctober 4, 2018 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Enroll Now for Free This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 6 min read Management consultant, educator and author Peter Drucker once declared that increasing the productivity of knowledge workers was “the most important contribution management needs to make in the 21st century.”Related: AI Is Taking the Art Out of SalesAI is changing that. More than 75 percent of companies are firing up AI to accelerate business development, automate busy work and deliver a better customer experience.AI algorithms are powering massive amounts of calculations and decisions because they can find patterns in data, unseen to the naked eye. They’re evolving technology in powerful ways that are enhancing our knowledge work:1. Automating the work humans don’t want to doThe most liberating support comes from AI doing the jobs we find monotonous. AI platforms can do repetitive tasks, like learn how to automatically update contact data in your customer relationship manager (CRM) or generate weekly status reports for your leads.In the business development world, AI and machine learning tools sort through leads and pull a wide range of data together about your prospect list. The tedious work of organizing contact information or researching prospect demographics can be handed to bots and allow your sales team to focus on selling.Related: 11 Ways to Boost Your Sales Performance2. Automating the work we can’t doHow many hours per week do you need to focus on selling to meet your quotas and keep the business growing?You probably don’t have hundreds of hours left over for data science. But, that’s what it takes to review large data sets to find trends in your industry, uncover business opportunities and stay ahead of the competition. Whether you want to know which companies are actively searching for your solution or how qualified they are, the data is available — but it’s complex and spread out across multiple websites and databases.AI bots and services can look at how many pieces of content are being shared around a topic, determine traffic volume, number of companies searching for your product/service and their lead score.AI can also deliver complex data sets to be reviewed on one platform, instead of having your team sort through thousands of lists or records. It can review and mark this data, then provide a report of actionable insights.3. Improving lead quality and shortening sales cyclesA full pipeline isn’t useful if the leads aren’t relevant or qualified. Today, many companies use a variety of people and tools to do basic data entry before these leads are delivered to a salesperson. Even then, they’re only guessing which leads will be interested.Sales teams that use predictive analytics spend less time prospecting and more time selling, which motivates them and makes them more successful in their role. This reduces sales department churn.AI is the new go-to partner for this relationship. Algorithms can now score leads based on key performance indicators (KPIs) and historical success patterns. The closer a new lead matches your existing best-value customers, the higher AI can score it.Delivering a flow of the best leads who are ready to buy can significantly reduce your sales cycle times. It gives you more revenue opportunities because your team isn’t overwhelmed with prospecting or follow up — they’re focused on selling to qualified opportunities.Focusing on the people already looking for your solution provides a more enjoyable process for both you and your future customer.Related: 7 Key Selling Habits All Sales Professionals Must Develop4. Predicting cross-sell and up-sell opportunitiesAI provides a connection that we weren’t expecting initially but are pleased to see: people who want the advanced services our sales team can offer.Up-sells and cross-sells are often missed because sales teams lack a definitive process for whom to up-sell and when. It’s the easiest and most neglected part of the sales process.AI makes your sales process more predictable by finding the customer personas who are most likely to say yes. That ensures sales teams are focused on customers with the largest revenue opportunity and the highest likelihood of converting.Advanced analytics can help create these personas, and the AI underneath it can continuously update those personas based on how successful its past model was. Buyers enjoy the help. Businesses enjoy the increase in revenue. And sales teams enjoy hitting those stretch goals and maximizing their bonuses.5. Forecasting sales projections for specific customer personas and offersInternational Data Corporation (IDC) notes that real-time personalization of ads will arrive by 2020. The goal for these platforms is improving the accuracy of targeting, increasing the precision of its messaging and ensuring the context is appropriate for the customer and their pain points.Smart AI will power these platforms and we can start to see it bridging the gap between inbound marketing and outbound sales development — aligning sales and marketing once and for all.When we look at the possibility: It’s targeting your best customer personas with the best messaging to analyze buying stages, marketing channels and optimize them all. In essence, we’re learning the personas that respond best to each offer and when up-sells correlate with an increase in churn.It’s possible for AI to scan an entire integrated database, from CRM and customer orders to conversation intelligence and lead scoring tools. Machine learning can build out customer personas that include risk prediction and sales potentials, segmenting groups into a variety of characteristics.It’s a nuanced understanding of the customer journey that takes a few extra things into account:Customer lifetime valueRisks relative to sales thresholdsIntervention points for sales and supportProjections by category and product type within customer groups as well as individual customersThis greater understanding can be used to guide a variety of business decisions. Initially, companies can use it to manage pricing and sales strategies. Later, there’s a clear understanding of messaging success rates by persona and product needs — even the potential for a tailored customer journey with offers designed to maximize revenue, while minimizing churn.Related: 7 Tips for Getting More Sales Meetings With Prospects6. Making human work more meaningful and valuableAI in business development boils down to this: It gives us the freedom to focus on our unique abilities. We’re not bogged down with repetitive busy work or boring data entry. We can focus on the meaningful work — the elements that lead to a successful sale and customer experience.AI runs in the background and gives us the ability to increase the productivity of knowledge work.”Every few hundred years throughout Western history, a sharp transformation has occurred,” Drucker observed in a 1992 essay for Harvard Business Review.In a matter of decades, technology altogether has evolved at light speed — its purpose, applications and capabilities. Years later, AI is changing our work in meaningful ways. And the people entering this brave new world can’t imagine work without this valuable tool. AI is transforming technology, saving us time and uncovering new sales opportunities — and surely exceeding the expectations of Peter Drucker.last_img read more

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first_img Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Recent Videos View all 606 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Videos | June 29, 2011 Brit ­ Web-Based Speech Recognition, 3-D, Cine CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items Technology Reports View all 9 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Find more SCCT news and videos Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Information Technology View all 220 items Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Brit Systems introduced three new Web-enabled features for its picture archiving and communications system (PACS) during the Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) 2011 meeting. SpeechWorks allows Web-based voice recognition and will eventually allow dictation via a smart phone. Brit’s new 3-D feature allows advanced visualization manipulation of images on Web-browsers.The zero-footprint WebWorks alls users to call up multi-frame images in any browser and play them in cine mode. For more information: www.brit.com last_img read more

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first_img News | Electronic Medical Records (EMR) | August 01, 2019 DrChrono Teams With DeepScribe to Automate Medical Note Taking in EHR DrChrono Inc. and DeepScribe announced a partnership so medical practices using DrChrono EHR can use artificial… read more News | Enterprise Imaging | July 29, 2019 Philips Announces 10-year Enterprise Informatics Agreement With Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Nancy Philips and Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy, a leading academic hospital in the Grand Est… read more FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Technology | Cybersecurity | August 07, 2019 ScImage Introduces PICOM ModalityGuard for Cybersecurity ScImage Inc. is bridging the gap between security and functionality with the introduction of the PICOM ModalityGuard…. read more News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more News | PACS | August 08, 2019 NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options… read more September 27, 2011 – Calgary Scientific Inc. has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market medical imaging application, ResolutionMD Mobile, as a mobile diagnostic application in the United States. With this secure, highly scalable, server-based software solution, physicians anywhere can rapidly access, view and interact with patient images and reports stored within any healthcare facility, and render a clinical diagnosis using their mobile devices. Prior non-diagnostic versions of this product are currently distributed and licensed under original equipment manufacturer (OEM) agreements with global leaders in medical imaging and information technology. In addition to the recent FDA clearance, ResolutionMD Mobile has also been licensed by Health Canada and bears the CE mark for distribution in Europe.The ResolutionMD mobile product was purpose-built from the existing ResolutionMD software, which first received FDA clearance in 2006. ResolutionMD Mobile was then mobile-enabled into a state-of-the-art product, utilizing the power of Calgary Scientific’s PureWeb platform technology, which allows ResolutionMD to simultaneously support multiple mobile devices and operating systems. This initial FDA clearance applies to versions of the solution running on Apple iPhone and iPad devices. The mobile app offers unparalleled performance; advanced capabilities and complete security; utilizes minimal bandwidth and offers strong performance even on 3/4G wireless; and ensures that no highly sensitive or confidential patient information is ever retained on the mobile device. The patient image data cannot be lost or stolen, as in the case of traditional mobile-device rendered software, which requires that data to be sent to the mobile device. The flexible, highly scalable, and easily installed environment of ResolutionMD Mobile expands the delivery of Calgary Scientific’s image-rendering technologies to empower healthcare organizations, physicians and patients to view images and reports, provide significantly enhanced levels of patient care, and reduce healthcare system costs.”We worked very closely with the FDA to identify and address the challenge of delivering the advanced visualization and integrated PACS functionality of our ResolutionMD server to various mobile devices,” said Kyle Peterson, director of regulatory and corporate affairs of Calgary Scientific. “Extensive bench-testing results and reads performed by practicing radiologists using typical but highly challenging cases for [computed tomography] CT and [magnetic resonance] MR were amongst the wide variety of supportive materials and studies submitted to the FDA during the course of this extensive process, which validated the primary diagnostic use of ResolutionMD Mobile.””The ability to view diagnostic quality images on mobile devices promises to speed healthcare delivery, particularly for urgent conditions or after hours,” says James A. Brink, M.D., professor and chair, department of diagnostic radiology at Yale University School of Medicine.ResolutionMD Mobile capabilities include:Interactive 2-D, MIP/MPR and 3-D advanced visualizationAnywhere, anytime access to and fully interactive use of MR and CT imagesSupports HIPAA Compliance – User authentication and encrypted communications further protect confidential patient informationConcurrent support for multiple devices and mobile operating platforms – The solution enables ResolutionMD Mobile capabilities on devices such as the Apple iPhone and iPad, as well as Android devices. Future versions of the server-based software solution will support an expanded list of mobile devices and operating systems, and supplementary applications to the FDA for clinical diagnostic imaging approval on those devices other than the iPhone and iPad will occur in then near future.Ambient Light User Assessment – Provides sample images to the user to assess the viewing suitability of current lighting conditions.ResolutionMD Mobile is currently available on Apple iPhone and iPad devices through the Apple App Store. A demonstration version (ResolutionMD Mobile Lite) is also available on the Apple App Store, providing access to anonymized patient images. The ResolutionMD Server is available from Calgary Scientific Inc., as well as from its family of global leading OEM partners in medical imaging and information technology.For more information: www.calgaryscientific.com News | PACS | July 02, 2019 Laurel Bridge and 3M M*Modal Partner to Improve DICOM Structured Reporting July 2, 2019 — Laurel Bridge Software announced an expanded relationship with 3M M*Modal, a provider of clinical docu read more center_img Technology | Enterprise Imaging | July 05, 2019 Hyland Healthcare Adds ImageNext Imaging Workflow Optimizer to Enterprise Imaging Suite Hyland Healthcare is launching ImageNext, a vendor-neutral imaging workflow optimizer that combines intelligent imaging… read more Related Content 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019 360 Degree View of a Smartphone Performing a Cardiac Ultrasound Exam This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i read more News | Remote Viewing Systems | July 16, 2019 Anatomage Releases Anatomage Cloud Platform Anatomage Inc. released an update to the Anatomage Cloud platform that allows medical and dental professionals to… read more Technology | September 27, 2011 Calgary Scientific’s ResolutionMD Mobile Receives FDA Clearance for Diagnostic Image Viewing on iPhones and iPads News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Konica Minolta Healthcare Partners With DiA Imaging Analysis for AI-based Cardiac Ultrasound Analysis DiA Imaging Analysis has partnered with Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. to expand analysis capabilities of… read morelast_img read more