Vermont Electric Cooperative announces annual meeting election results

first_imgVermont Electric Cooperative, Inc,Results of Vermont Electric Cooperative’s (VEC) director elections and proposed bylaw amendments were announced during the Cooperative’s Annual Meeting held in Derby on Saturday, May 21, 2011. Incumbent District 1 Director Don Worth of Island Pond won re-election with 307 votes; challengers Ken Mason received 208 and Paul King received 75. Incumbent District 6 Director Dan Parsons of Richford ran unopposed and received 366 votes. Incumbent West Zone Director Dan Carswell of Franklin won re-election with 764 votes; challengers Robert Pearl received 262 votes, Caleb Elder 211 votes and Naomi Shaw 186 votes. Two proposed amendments to the bylaws also passed. An amendment to add conditions and processes for removing Directors passed with 2,293 votes in favor and 314 opposed and an amendment to eliminate a requirement that regular meetings of the board of directors be held within the VEC service territory passed with 2,296 votes in favor and 325 opposed.  Featured speakers at the meeting included Vermont Public Service Department Commissioner, Liz Miller, who spoke about Vermont’s energy future. Chief Executive Officer Dave Hallquist reported on VEC’s successful smart meter deployment and discussed the tough choices faced when choosing power suppliers. About 300 VEC members and guests attended the meeting. During a question and answer session there was a lively discussion about power supply options, including the proposed Kingdom Community Wind project in Lowell, Vermont. Members also raised questions about rising electricity costs and expressed concerns about state and national energy policy issues.Soruce: VEC. 5.22.2011last_img read more

UN official: Bird biosecurity lapses could worsen food crisis

first_imgJun 20, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – Lax biosecurity measures around poultry in some countries could lead to an increasing number of H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks that could exacerbate the global food crisis, an official from the United Nations Food and AgricultureOrganization (FAO) said at an international infectious disease conference in Malaysia today.Juan Lubroth, senior officer with the FAO’s infectious diseases group, made the comments during symposia on influenza in animals and people at the International Congress on Infectious Diseases (ICID), which started yesterday in Kuala Lumpur and runs through Jun22. ICID is the annual meeting of the International Society for InfectiousDiseases.Lubroth said though fewer countries have experienced recent avian flu outbreaks, numerous small outbreaks continue to occur, according to an Associated Press (AP) report today. “It’s like a boiling pot, and we need to keep the lid on that before it gets worse,” he said.He said 80% of the world’s poor depend on livestock for their livelihood, and poultry has been an inexpensive protein source, the AP reported. However, he added that about 240 million poultry have been slaughtered to control the spread of H5N1.Failure to protect the food supply of the world’s poor only makes worse the effect of rising prices of rice, corn, and other staples, Lubroth said.Global veterinary service capacity needs to be expanded, and more countries need to be transparent regarding disease surveillance and develop surveillance systems and policies to manage the disease, he said. “We fail to see that political commitment.”In the abstract that accompanied the presentation, Lubroth wrote that veterinary experts worry that government officials, in a panic over the threat to human health, are focusing nearly all of their efforts on accumulating antiviral and vaccine stockpiles, “forgetting that the origin of the malady was—and remains—a poultry problem.”Lubroth wrote that a lag in funding for poultry safety initiatives has prevented national veterinary services from mounting the border and regulatory controls needed to contain the disease within Southeast Asia.Biosecurity: stalled or improving?Today’s comments from the FAO seem to counter some of the recent comments from a UN official on the state of global pandemic preparedness. On Jun 18, David Nabarro, the UN’s influenza coordinator, listed national improvements in poultry biosecurity as a reason behind the organization’s assessment that the world is better prepared for an influenza pandemic, according to an earlier report. He also said more countries are focusing their efforts on the link between human and animal health.Other pandemic experts, such as Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of CIDRAP News, disagree that the world is better prepared for a pandemic and say governments have not planned for supply, medicine, and utility disruptions that could severely damage the world’s economy and worsen the impact of the disease on health.Nabarro, however, expressed concern that the virus remains entrenched in several countries, particularly Indonesia, the country that has had the highest number of human cases anddeaths.Indonesia reports on diagnostic challenges in human casesIn another presentation during the same ICID symposia, Sardikin Giriputro, director of the Sulianti Saroso Infectious Disease Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, gave an update on that country’s clinical cases and spoke of challenges in diagnosing H5N1 infections.With 135 cases and 110 deaths from the disease, according to the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) update, Indonesia has been hit harder than any other country by the H5N1 virus.However, early this month Indonesia’s health minister, Siti Fadilah Supari, said that the number of human cases has slowed this year, according to a Jun 5 AP report. She said only 18 people have been infected with the virus so far this year, compared with 27 for the same period in 2007 and 35 in 2006.Giriputro said that some patients with H5N1 infections have been misdiagnosed with dengue fever and typhoid, which has delayed antiviral treatment, according to a report today from Reuters. Oseltamivir (Tamiflu) is the drug of choice for H5N1 illnesses and is best given within 24 to 36 hours of symptom onset.He told the group that medical officials in Indonesia are finding that rapid test kits used to diagnose the H5N1 virus in animals are less reliable for testing human samples, according to the Reuters report.”It depends on the viral load [from human samples],” Giriputro said, adding that false-negatives can occur when there isn’t enough virus in the human sample.Indonesia’s government has been distributing oseltamivir to health centers in areas that have had poultry outbreaks and human cases, he said. Physicians prescribe the virus without waiting for laboratory results if patients have influenza-like illnesses and may have had contact with sick poultry.In an abstract that accompanied his talk, Giriputro said about 50% of Indonesia’s H5N1 patients had a history of direct contact with sick birds, 30% had indirect contact, and 20% had no contact that could be determined.See also:Lubroth and Giriputro ICID abstracts (pages 2 and 3, respectively)Jun 18 CIDRAP News report “UN:Pandemic preparedness pays off, but threat remains”last_img read more

Fall movie lineup guarantees wide range of genres

first_imgAfter a summer filled with laughs (Amy Schumer’s Trainwreck), tears (Inside Out), screams of terror (Jurassic World) and flops (Terminator Genisys), this fall’s new releases are about to hit the screen. Though films with darker content are typically released in the fall, there are also several new films that will provide some great laughs. Here is an introduction to the top 10 most promising films for the fall.1. Black Mass (Sept. 18)Johnny Depp, who is either a master of disguise or equipped with an excellent make-up team, is riveting yet terrifying in the released previews for Black Mass. Depp portrays real-life American gangster Whitey Bulger, who became an FBI informant working out of South Boston. With strong supporting casting — Benedict Cumberbatch, Dakota Johnson and Kevin Bacon — this rattling film is sure to be a dramatic shift from Depp’s recent trend of box office and critical misses.2. Everest (Sept. 18)Based on the 1996 Mount Everest disaster, which killed eight climbers and left several others stranded, this dramatic film promises plot twists and a big climax. The main focus of the film will be the survival attempts of the two exhibition groups who climbed the mountain during those fateful days, one led by Scott Fisher (Jake Gyllenhall) and the other led by Rob Hall (Jason Clarke).3. The Intern (Sept. 25)After playing stunning characters in the woeful world of Les Misérables and the not so hopeful future of Interstellar, Anne Hathaway steps into a more uplifting setting. Written and directed by Nancy Meyers, this charming, comedic film stars Hathaway, Nat Wolff, Adam DeVine and Robert De Niro. Jules Ostin, portrayed by Hathaway, is the founder and CEO of a fashion e-commerce company: a little neurotic, incredibly stressed and overworked. Though the woman struggling to juggle it all is a cliché seen many times on screen, the film looks to be made a little more interesting with the addition of Ben Whittaker, played by De Niro, a senior who will intern at Ostin’s youthful firm through a community outreach program. Throughout the film, it is Whittaker who will help Ostin open herself up to the world.4. Steve Jobs (Oct. 9)Due to overwhelmingly negative reviews of Jobs, the 2013 biopic featuring Ashton Kutcher, from viewers and former Apple employees, it was a surprise that a new cinematic attempt at piecing together the complicated life of Apple’s cofounder followed so soon. For the majority of 2014, the bulk of press about the upcoming second-attempt biopic were the changes in directors and cast. This was coupled with a major studio change, from Sony to Universal Pictures. Out of all that drama comes a picture directed by Danny Boyle and starring Michael Fassbender. This new biopic, in which audiences can catch a glimpse of Job’s overly analytical yet incredibly fascinating personality, appears much more promising than the 2013 version.5. Goosebumps (Oct. 16)After a long struggle to get it done, the Goosebumps movie is finally here, in what is clearly going to be the Halloween movie of the year. Early previews have shown that viewers should be prepared for lots of laughs, as Jack Black takes on the leading role as Goosebumps author R.L. Stine. Additionally, many adventures show Black and the children of the film, portrayed by Dylan Minnette and Odeya Rush, chasing down the ghosts and monsters who have accidentally been released from the books and are wreaking havoc all over town.6. The Peanuts Movie (Nov. 6)To commemorate the 65th anniversary of the comic strip, a live action version is making its way to the big screen. The whole gang joins Charlie Brown as he tries to gather the courage to finally make a move on the Little Red-Haired Girl. This film looks to have no shortage of laughs as early previews of the film show Charlie trying as hard as he can to change for his object of affection, with hilariously disastrous results.7. By the Sea (Nov. 13)Subtract the mass shootouts against enemy firms and assassination attempts, yet keep the plot about a couple trying to keep their waning marriage alive, and Mr. and Mrs. Smith becomes the idyllic By the Sea. The film marks power couple Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie-Pitt’s reunion on the big screen. Though both Pitts produced the film, Jolie-Pitt also wrote and directed it. By the Sea hasn’t had a huge marketing campaign — some film stills have been released, but the majority of excitement has been raised by speculation from the fans. While Jolie-Pitt’s directorial skills received mixed reviews from Unbroken, By the Sea seems incredibly promising in its romantic plotline and choice of actors. Since on-screen chemistry was undeniable in Mr. and Mrs. Smith, there’s a chance this feat by the same actors can achieve the same appeal.8. The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 2 (Nov. 20)In the much-anticipated last installment of the Hunger Games film series, Katniss and crew are ready to obliterate President Snow and end the Games. The frenzy from fans about the final film has reached skyrocketing heights, but the main concern is whether the last installment will justify the hype. The decision to split the third book into two films has been mixed, with some critics claiming it unnecessary, especially since Mockingjay: Part 1 received average reviews and seemed to fall short of expectations.9. Victor Frankenstein (Nov. 25)After nearly two years of production and release delays, the Frankenstein movie has arrived. James McAvoy stars as the titular character, a young medical student, while Daniel Radcliffe plays Igor, who has been known as Victor’s assistant from previous Frankenstein horror films. The 2015 film is told from Igor’s perspective, and though no previews have been released thus far, expect a dark and profound performance from Radcliffe.10. The Good Dinosaur (Nov. 25)With smash hit Inside Out dominating the box office, Pixar is looking to continue the magic by doing something they have never done before — release two films in one year. Created by those who worked on Finding Nemo and Inside Out, The Good Dinosaur tells the tale of Arlo, a young Apatosaurus becomes lost after using his father, and on his way home befriends a Tarzan-esque little boy who he names Spot. The film looks very endearing with quintessential Pixar tearjerker moments. As Pixar has been relying on an overabundant amount of sequels for the past couple of years, The Good Dinosaur promises to take audiences on an original adventure.last_img read more

Karolis Kundrotas builds off Lithuanian upbringing as Elon freshman

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Elon administration charged head basketball coach Matt Matheny to go find overseas players. He had already established relationships in different countries when he was an assistant at Davidson. But now in charge, he was tasked with finding international athletes for his own program.He found Karolis Kundrotas at a prep school in London that has served as a basketball hotbed of talent. But London is not where Kundrotas found his love for basketball. It’s from a basketball-obsessed city in Lithuania that has developed numerous NBA talents.“Karolis fits perfectly into what we look for in recruiting at Elon,” Matheny said, “He’s someone that is coachable, that is tough and that is willing to work.”The 6-foot, 11-inch freshman Kundrotas, who was born and raised in Kaunus will come to the Carrier Dome on Saturday at 7 p.m. to face Syracuse (2-0) as a part of the Battle 4 Atlantis tournament. Though he’s scored just five points in 15 minutes this season for Elon (2-1), Kundrotas’ past stops shaped the promising player.Kundrotas moved to England with his mother in 2006 and played at the Barking Abbey Basketball Academy. The academy’s professionalism helped prepare him to play Division I.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter failing to bring in European recruits in past years, Mattheny successfully reeled in Kundrotas.“The coaches there are really sharp,” Kundrotas said of the Academy. “The closest program that I’ve been to that matched American standards.”The Barking Abbey program, which head coach Lloyd Gardner called the British version of an American“prep school,” is linked to a normal British state high school and is regarded as one of the top basketball programs in the UK for developing young players.The Abbey program previously sent fellow Lithuanian Paulius Satkus one year earlier to James Madison and Kundrotas followed a similar path.Program director Matt Clark said that every Lithuanian player comes with solid fundamentals and a 3-point shot, which Clark called a “signature” of all European big men.“Lithuanians grow up with basketball,” Clark said. “It’s their national sport. A large number of their heroes are basketball players.”Kundrotas’ hometown in Lithuania, Kaunus, is a goldmine for basketball stars, producing several NBA players including Zydrunas Ilgauskas, Donatas Motiejūnas Arvydas Sabonis, Šarūnas Marčiulionis and Linas Kleiza.“Being from the same place,” the freshman said, “they’re people that I look up to. I idolize them.”While many young athletes in Lithuania look up to players like Ilgauskus and Montiejunas, Kundrotas said that his hero was another Lithuanian basketball star.Šarūnas “Šaras” Jasikevičius was another product of Kaunus, Lithuania and played point guard in the United States for Maryland. Jasikevičius played a majority of his career overseas, but had a brief stint with the Indiana Pacers in the NBA.“He was the man in my eyes,” Kundrotas said, “with Zydrunas of course, he’s also legend.”Kundrotas hasn’t come close to the level that his heroes have reached yet, but Matheny thinks highly of his future.Matheny believes that despite Kundrotas coming more game-ready than the coaching staff anticipated, he still has a lot to work on and to learn before he can play big minutes for the Phoenix.Both are excited for the opportunity to play at Syracuse. It’s a chance for Kundrotas to play in the type of venue his countrymen became accustomed to.“I can’t believe the opportunity I’ve got from where I come from,” Kundrotas said, “I can’t wait.” Comments Published on November 20, 2015 at 12:02 pm Contact Jack: jfupton@syr.edulast_img read more