Burlington named one of 10 Best Cities for the Next Decade by Kiplinger’s

first_imgWashington, DC and Burlington, VT, May 26, 2010 Kiplinger s Personal Finance announced today that it has named Burlington one of its 10 Best Cities for the Next Decade with a focus on locales that specialize in innovative thinking. This year s picks are profiled in the July issue of Kiplinger s Personal Finance magazine, on newsstands June 8, and online now at www.kiplinger.com/links/bestcities(link is external) with additional interactive features.To identify the winners, Kiplinger s teamed up with Kevin Stolarick, research director at the Martin Prosperity Institute, a think tank that studies economic prosperity. New ideas generate new businesses, says Stolarick, who this year evaluated U.S. cities for growth and growth potential. In the places where innovation works, it really works. People in fields such as science, engineering, architecture, and education are catalysts of vitality and livability in a city.Kiplinger s methodology included the consideration of several economic indicators and the use of a formula to identify cities with current and likely future growth in high-quality jobs and income. Kiplinger s also looked at affordability, public transit infrastructure, and the number of creative class workers (such as educators, writers, and scientists) in the area. Kiplinger s also made visits to each city to interview residents, business leaders, and community leaders.The Kiplinger s profile of Burlington states that this mountain city wants to be a role model for saving the planet. Environmentalism isn t just ingrained in the city s diverse economy; it s the driver for much of its economic growth and continues on to say that creativity and entrepreneurship define Burlington. The town is a haven for writers and artists, and that innovative spirit energizes white-collar workers as well. (full profile: http://www.kiplinger.com/magazine/archives/best-cities-2010-burlington-v(link is external)…)  It s no coincidence that economic vitality and livability go hand in hand, says Kiplinger s senior editor Robert Frick. Creativity in music, arts and culture, plus neighborhoods and recreational facilities that rank high for coolness, attract like-minded professionals who go on to cultivate a region s business scene. All of these factors make our 2010 Best Cities more than just great places to live. They re also great places to start a business or find a job.   It s always gratifying to have the efforts of residents, local businesses and organizations, and City government recognized nationally, said Mayor Bob Kiss. Burlington has distinguished itself with its focus on green economic development and encouragement of a diverse and creative economy. I appreciate Kiplinger s prestigious designation of Burlington as a city of the present as well as the future.Kiplinger s Best Cities 2010 includes the following online features at www.kiplinger.com/links/bestcities:(link is external)Narrated walking-tour slide shows with Kiplinger s editors and writersA Which City is Best for You? calculator to help readers determine the city which best matches their goals and tastesA spreadsheet that lets readers see where their own city ranks in different key categoriesA Facebook Readers Choice poll where audiences can vote for their favorite city among Kiplinger s top 10 picks or add their own favorite city to the mixBurlington was listed 8th among the cities recognized, which included: Austin, TX; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; Boulder, CO; Salt Lake City, UT; Rochester, MN; Des Moines, IA; West Hartford, CT; and Topeka, KS.The Kiplinger s recognition follows upon Burlington s recent appreciation by Forbes.com as one of America s Prettiest Towns and a 2010 Top 100 Place to Live by RelocateAmerica.com. Burlington was also recently chosen as a First Wave City for the Carbon War Room Initiative, which seeks to leverage private investment for environmental initiatives in cities such as Burlington with a commitment to environmentalism and green economic development (see http://www.ci.burlington.vt.us/docs/1912.pdf(link is external)). Burlington has been engaged in a comprehensive rewrite and update of its climate action plan (http://burlingtonclimateaction.com/(link is external)) and recently released an extensive carbon cost-benefit analysis to guide the City in prioritizing greenhouse gas reduction initiatives. Mayor Kiss has set a goal of reducing Burlington s carbon footprint 20 percent by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050.More on Ranking MethodologyKiplinger s included data on population growth, unemployment rate, income growth, and cost of living to determine city rankings. Martin Prosperity Institute research director Kevin Stolarick derived a formula that identifies cities with current and likely future growth in high-quality jobs and income. Kiplinger s also weighed affordability and public-transit infrastructure the latter being an important factor to ensure continued growth in certain metro areas. Also included in the formula is a creative class measure, which stems from Stolarick s work with Richard Florida, academic director of the Martin Institute and author of The Rise of the Creative Class. This measure reflects the number of creative-class workers including educators, writers, and scientists living in the area. Further research involved traveling to cities to interview business and community leaders and residents. The rankings factor in both the data and the results of Kiplinger s reporting.About Kiplinger s Personal FinanceFor nine decades, the Kiplinger organization has led the way in personal finance and business forecasting. Founded in 1920 by W.M. Kiplinger, the company developed one of the nation’s first successful newsletters in modern times. The Kiplinger Letter, launched in 1923, remains the longest continually published newsletter in the United States. In 1947, Kiplinger created Kiplinger s Personal Finance, the nation’s first personal finance magazine. Located in the heart of our nation’s capital, the Kiplinger mission is to deliver sound, unbiased advice for families and businesses in clear, concise language.Source: Kiplinger’s. 5.26.2010last_img read more

U.S. Shutdown Fallout Continues as Agencies Reschedule Grant Panels

first_imgResearch agencies are spelling out how the 16-day U.S. government shutdown has affected grantmaking efforts—and how they will try to catch up. The reshuffling could mean delays of 4 months or more for some applicants and a lot more work for some reviewers. And at least one academic researcher worries that the disruption could be career-ending.At the National Science Foundation (NSF), the shutdown forced the cancellation of 98 review panels involving 811 scientists, acting NSF Director Cora Marrett told reporters during a teleconference today.  “They will all have to be rescheduled,” she said, but the agency isn’t yet ready to provide details. At the National Institutes of Health (NIH), officials canceled more than 200 peer-review meetings involving thousands of scientists and more than 11,000 applications. Because the shutdown fell smack in the middle of one of the agency’s thrice-a-year review periods, many peer-review panels will now meet early next year.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)NIH describes its plan, which officials had hinted at earlier, in this notice posted late Friday and in this blog post from NIH extramural chief Sally Rockey. “Due to the shut-down timing, it is extraordinarily complex to reschedule all these deadlines and reviews,” Rockey writes.To catch up, NIH has moved October due dates to November, and those who had submitted during the shutdown have the option to “refresh” their application.The biggest shock is for investigators who thought their proposals would be reviewed in October. “[I]t is impossible to manage the logistics of rescheduling hundreds of review meetings in the next six or so weeks,” Rockey writes, so many meetings will now be held in February or March and the final review step—by individual institutes’ councils—will be moved from January to May.This means that researchers will have to wait longer to get word about their grants. It also means many reviewers will do “double duty”—they will review twice the usual number of proposals. Although “a far from an ideal situation,” writes Rockey, “we believe this is the most manageable and equitable approach.”That has not stopped a wave of comments on Rockey’s blog and the DrugMonkey blog from investigators worried about the changes. “All grants submitted in these two cycles will be negatively affected as reviewers will be overwhelmed,” wrote Derek Abbott on Rockey’s blog. He and others begged Rockey to try to schedule more meetings in November. “In my opinion, postponing an entire review cycle will be disasterous [sic],” Abbott wrote.Another scientist named Tenure-Track Asst Prof wrote that she (or he) needs a funding decision sooner than June to remain in a tenure track position: “[T]he consequences of this decision could very well be career-ending for those of us who are in need of external funding for re-appointment.”At NSF, Marrett said she’s asked senior managers “to tell me about the most urgent panels” so that the agency can figure out the best way to reschedule its workload. “We can’t so readily restart everything,” she explained, noting that the logistics—rebooking plane tickets and hotel rooms, plus conference space at NSF—are daunting. The agency will also reschedule submission dates that fell during the shutdown for applicants responding to program solicitations, a process that Marrett said will have a ripple effect on future solicitations as well.Marrett noted that 385 staff members at the NSF-funded National Radio Astronomy Observatory were furloughed during the shutdown, along with 82 people working in the North American office of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array operating in Chile. But she said that the NSF-funded academic fleet was not affected by the shutdown, and that only minor adjustments are needed in planning the official dedication of NSF’s new Arctic research vessel, the Sikuliaq.last_img read more