Julian Buescher operates from defensive position in wake of Juuso Pasanen’s injury

first_img Published on October 28, 2015 at 8:11 pm Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus Facebook Twitter Google+ Julian Buescher doesn’t have the height of Juuso Pasanen — the two-inch difference preventing him from consistently winning headers. He doesn’t have the physicality either, lacking the ability to muscle opponents off the ball as effectively as his teammate.But for the second game in a row, Buescher will likely have to take Pasanen’s spot on the field.“He has the same role as Juuso did,” midfielder Oyvind Alseth said. “Keep moving the ball and be a shield for our center backs.”Pasanen and midfielder Korab Syla both have “a little way to go” before coming back from injuries, head coach Ian McIntyre said. They’re day-to-day, though Buescher is “pretty sure” Pasanen will be back for the postseason.The injuries have pushed Buescher, Syracuse’s most offensive player, back to its most defensive midfield position. It took the Orange almost 75 minutes to score against North Carolina State on Friday, but SU was able to come back for the 2-1 victory. No. 12 Syracuse (10-4-2, 3-3-1 Atlantic Coast) will try to find a way to do the same in its second— and possibly last — full game with its altered lineup when it heads to Boston College (8-6-1, 3-4) on Friday at 7 p.m.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU is currently sits at sixth place in the conference. With a win and some help it could earn the No. 4 seed and host a game in the second round of the ACC tournament along with getting a first-round bye.“It went OK on Friday,” Buescher said. “I hope I do better next Friday. I think then I am done with it for the season, but I don’t mind the position at all.”What Buescher lacks in size and physicality he makes up for in ball handling and stamina, Alseth said. Buescher added that he relies on the “big guys” behind him to win the headers coming his way.From the defensive midfield, Buescher can dictate the game a little bit more, he said. In the past, playing the attacking midfield, he’s often too far forward to maneuver the ball around the field and is the one receiving the pass instead of distributing it.Sometimes Buescher edges up in situations where Pasanen would stay back, midfielder Andreas Jenssen said, forcing him or Alseth to cover defensively. Buescher said he’ll try to go forward even more against Boston College and see how it works out.“Getting that balance in midfield without Juuso in there … everyone is adapting and changing their roles a little bit,” McIntyre said.Buescher has been one of the main catalysts for Syracuse’s 16th-ranked scoring offense — leading the team with seven goals, seven assists, 21 points and 47 shots. Whenever his position shifted from center attacking midfielder earlier in the season, it was to a forward position next to Ben Polk.Friday was just the third time all season he didn’t register a shot on goal — a product of his move to center defensive midfielder.“He has been a guy responsible for a lot of the things we’ve been producing forward so it puts some more responsibility on the rest of us playing up there,” Alseth said. “We’ve just got to embrace the challenge. … It’s time for the rest of us to step up.”Polk has emerged as the Orange’s second-leading point producer and defender Louis Cross netted just his third goal in two seasons with SU to win the game against N.C. State on Friday.Even Jenssen had a prime scoring chance that he pushed just wide.Alseth said there were concerns going into the N.C. State game, but the team learned it could win without Pasanen, without Syla and with one of its most dangerous offensive weapons seldom in the attacking third.Against Boston College, Syracuse will have to prove it again.Said McIntyre: “We’ll find a way as we did on Friday.” Commentslast_img read more

Syracuse can’t contain Florida State’s aggressive baserunning in 8-0 loss

first_img Comments FSU senior Carsyn Gordon hit a short dribbler down the third base line. As SU pitcher Sophie Dandola charged in to throw the ball home, Seminole freshman Savannah Parker appeared to be running into an easy out at the plate.Rather than get thrown out, though, Parker turned back to third. SU catcher Gianna Carideo could have done what the Orange have practiced.“When two people are going to the same base, one of them will be out,” SU head coach Shannon Doepking said.But Carideo didn’t make the right play. A rundown began, and eventually, the Orange forgot to rotate and cover home. Third baseman Hannah Dossett made a desperation throw, one that shouldn’t have been necessary if Carideo had just trapped the two runners on third, tagged one out and never thrown the ball. Dossett’s throw made its way to the backstop, allowing another run to score behind Parker. Instead of 4-0, the scoreboard read 6-0 in the top of the fourth. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFrom the opening inning, No. 5 Florida State (46-8, 17-5 Atlantic Coast) was aggressive on the basepaths. The Seminoles stole four bases and took extra bases on multiple balls in play to pressure the Orange’s defense in an eventual 8-0 win in six innings. Syracuse (20-29, 8-14) knew coming into the game that the Seminoles would look to run often, but they couldn’t make the simple plays and allowed FSU to take “free bases,” Doepking said.“From their stats, you know they’re going to run. I need to have a better outing,” Carideo said. “My arm wasn’t where I wanted it to be today. You know where (the pitch) is going to be, it’s about getting your body in the right position.”The Seminoles had stolen 94 bases on 110 attempts entering Friday’s game, an 85.5% clip.All season, Doepking has stressed the importance of aggressive baserunning for her own offense. It’s a major reason why senior Alicia Hansen has a career-high number of steals and steal attempts. On Friday, while the Orange failed to reach base until the fifth inning, FSU marched and plodded its way around the bases. Carideo entered the game throwing out 46% of runners in ACC play, but today, she wasn’t effective. FSU sophomore Cali Harrod led off the opening inning with a walk, and on the first pitch of the next at-bat, stole second base. Carideo’s throw bounced into sophomore Gabby Teran’s glove, but it was way too late. Harrod scored standing up after a Gordon single. The next at-bat, the Seminoles again tested Carideo’s arm. Her throw to second bounced off Teran’s glove and into center field, which allowed Seminole sophomore Sydney Sherill to take third. On a later steal attempt by the Seminoles, Carideo lost the ball on the transfer from her glove to her hand and didn’t even manage a throw to second. The mishandle prompted one FSU fan to yell “too easy” after the steal. The Seminoles’ athleticism, which SU said it had seen on film and in the stat sheets, added pressure on SU. “I’ve thrown out runners before, I know I can do it again,” Carideo said. “it doesn’t matter what they have across their chest.”The increased pressure showed itself in the Orange throwing the ball across the infield. On one play, a ground ball in the hole to shortstop, a runner advanced from first base to third base after sophmore Neli Casares-Maher made a throw to first that couldn’t beat the runner. In the sixth inning, with the Orange staving off the eight-run mercy rule, aggressive baserunning manufactured the final run to close out the game. Right fielder Elizabeth Mason went from first to third on a single to center field and then scored on a groundout in the ensuing at-bat. The only baserunning mistake FSU made in an afternoon of successes on the bases came as Alex Acevedo threw to Dossett across the diamond to throw out junior Dani Morgan at third. “They took bases on us left and right,” Doepking said. “On plays where we don’t have plays, we have to stop throwing the ball across the diamond. ‘Hold the ball, just chill, hang out. It’ll be okay.’” Published on May 3, 2019 at 7:48 pm Contact Anthony: amdabbun@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Narco trafficking lands man in jail

first_imgA 27-year-old man who allegedly had 198 grams of cannabis in his bag was on Wednesday remanded to prison after he appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts.Carlos ChristopherCarlos Christopher of Linden-Soesdyke Highway appeared before Magistrate Faith McGusty.Christopher denied that on October 21, 2019, at Lombard Street, Georgetown, he had in his possession 198 grams of cannabis for the purpose of trafficking.The prosecution is contending that Police ranks, acting on information received, went to Lombard Street and conducted a search on Christopher. It is contended that the cannabis was found in a bag the defendant had in his possession.According to the prosecution’s case, Christopher claimed that he was transporting the substance for someone in exchange for a phone.The case will continue on November 13, 2019.last_img read more